Contrast control & Crane paper

Discussion in 'Alternative Processes' started by eggshell, Aug 21, 2005.

  1. eggshell

    eggshell Member

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    Greeting,

    Since I'm unable to ship Potassium Chlorate or Dichromate for pt/pd process, Is there an alternative chemical that I can use that do not fall under Hazmat? I hesitate to buy sol. no. 2 due to it's short shelf life and frequent shipping expanse.

    For anyone who purchase paper directly from crane.com, could you kindly let me know if Crane's Choice Wove 8.5 x 11 90lb. Cover Sheets is the correct range of paper for pt/pd? I'm looking at #25044 Crane's Choice Pearl White Wove from that range.

    Response appreciated!
     
  2. eggshell

    eggshell Member

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    I think Crane's Choice Wove 8.5 x 11 90lb. Cover Sheets isn't the correct range as the description says 25% cotton. Thanks again!
     
  3. Jorge

    Jorge Inactive

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    YOu can use hydrogen peroxide in the developer for contrast control. I think some people also use it in the emulsion but I am not sure.

    OTOH I dont know why you cant ship Potassium Chlorate, I got some from B&S. As long as you keep it under certain amount it is not a hazardous material. I think 10 gr is not Haz. 10 Gr should be enough to make you a lot of the evil #2.
     
  4. Mateo

    Mateo Subscriber

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    I would consider trying the sol #2 anyways. You do realize that you can buy it as a drypack, add water on your end and away you go.
     
  5. clay

    clay Subscriber

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    If you are doing pure palladium, consider using the Na2 contrast control method. It will cool the image tone down a little, but it is very flexible and does not go bad on you. It also does not cause any graining or floculation when trying to really increase the print contrast.
     
  6. eggshell

    eggshell Member

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    Thanks jorge, meteo. I would certainly try to get a small amount Potassium Chlorate from B&S. They indicated "No international shipping" for the mentioned chemicals, but as meteo says, they have drypack (which I'm confused about initially) so I think my problem is solved.

    Clay, I'm going to ask the stupid question. What is Na2? Unless I missed it, I couldn't find it in "The New Platinum Print" book.

    Thanks to everyone for the help.
     
  7. Donsta

    Donsta Member

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    It's a new idea on contrast control - sodium chloroplatinate - not mentioned in the book due to publishing date. Probably the simplest method - you just use it with palladium solution and ferric Oxalate no.1 . As Clay suggests, you cannot get very warm tones with it, but it last for a very long time and does not cause any issues even when you are requiring a huge contrast boost. I think Dick Arentz' website has a little info on it.
     
  8. eggshell

    eggshell Member

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    Thanks Donsta, sounds cool to me. I'll check it out. Appreciate it!
     
  9. sanking

    sanking Member

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    You can find the information in the 2nd editioin of Dick's book. There is also a chart for contrast control for negatives of different DR on his web site.

    Sandy
     
  10. eggshell

    eggshell Member

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    Thanks Sandy, I am investigating Dick Arentz's website as we speak. Appreciate the response.