Contrast filter newbie questions

Discussion in 'Exposure Discussion' started by tkamiya, Jul 13, 2010.

  1. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    I'm not quite sure which sub-forums are best suited to filter questions. This is my best guess.

    I am going to try using B&W contrast filters, such as red, orange, yellow, green, etc, etc, etc. Since I don't have any at the moment, that means brand new purchase....

    I can use some advise from more experienced folks here.

    I have lenses with filter ring anywhere from 52mm and up. Currently, 52, 58, and 62 but are likely to grow more.

    Looking around for options, I see Cokin system may be a good option as I can buy one set of filters (size P) and adapters to cover all but the fact the filters are made of resin concerns me a bit. Buying Hoya or B&W for every size seems very costly. Buying big one (like 77) and buying reducing rings are also quite costly.

    I don't mind spending reasonable amount of money for I'll be using them for long time, but I do want to do this wisely.

    How should I approach this? Any ideas or experiences will be deeply appreciated.
     
  2. R gould

    R gould Member

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    You can safely use the cokin filter system, the filters are made of optical grade resin, the same grade as used foe eyeglass lenses,and shoulkd last well with a little bit of care, Many photographers swear by them, or if you want to use round optical glass filters get fittings for your largest lens, and use stepping rings for the others, or do as many photographers do, including me, and use a bit of Blu Tac to attach the filters,Richard
     
  3. karthik

    karthik Member

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    I use both methods - Cokin P and individual filters. I am afraid I haven't found either to be always better.

    I have not noticed any problems due to the Cokin filters being made of resin. If you always handle them by the edges and prompty replace them in their boxes when not in use there should not be any issues with durability. Nor is there any terribly deterioration in optical quality - though I never performed any rigorous tests :smile:

    Positives for Cokin: Having a singe filter and multiple holders is cheaper.

    Negatives for Cokin: You cannot quickly put the camera back in a bag for any reason. Storing lenses in the bag with holders attached is harder/impossible. So you would typically end up doing this every tie you change a lens: "Remove cokin holder (and filter), remove lens, attach new lens, attach cokin holder (and lens)".

    I sometimes like to keep the lens cover on - you can't do this when the Cokin holder is attached.
     
  4. R gould

    R gould Member

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    I used to have a filter holder for each lens, they are not that expensive, and use the slide cover that came nwith the holder, so all I had to do when changing a lens was take out the filter,slide in the cover tight to the lens,and change the lens, and I never had any problems, makes cokin as easy as single filters,Richard
     
  5. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    Options... options... options...
     
  6. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    I will warn you, Cokin filters in the holder leave a gap at the side that allows for reflections in certain lighting conditions. I have two different size of Cokins, A and P plus I have screw on filters. I recommend buying the largest diameter size needed for your lenses and then getting step up rings to adapt them to your smaller diameter lenses. I use red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and a polarizer. The green and blue are mostly for orthochromatic film(red has no effecf). Combining any single color with the polarizer makes for a more pronounced effect, mostly you only need a single color. Keep in mind, you will need to run your own tests to see what works and when. There isn't any magic in them, they are just another tool in your kit.

    check out: www.crime-scene-investigator.com/filters1.html It will give you some needed info on what filters are really supposed to do for you.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 13, 2010
  7. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    I have since found out, places like KEH has a LARGE selection of used filters very VERY cheaply.... I'm quite torn at this moment.
     
  8. Q.G.

    Q.G. Inactive

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    You can avoid that by getting (better) Cromatek filters and their better holder instead of the Cokin stuff.
    :wink: