Contrasty film

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Stephanie Brim, Apr 2, 2008.

  1. Stephanie Brim

    Stephanie Brim Member

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    I'm wanting to shoot a film with high contrast for a few shots I'm wanting to do soon. What films play well with HC-110 or Rodinal (as I've standardized on these developers) and deliver a pretty contrasty image?

    Crap, forgot to mention that I'm wanting this in 120 or 4x5. Tech Pan is DEFINITELY out at the prices I'm seeing it go for. :wink:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 2, 2008
  2. Uhner

    Uhner Member

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    Try Ilford Delta 100 in Rodinal. This combination is capable of producing punchy negatives from very low contrast scenes.
     
  3. Neal

    Neal Subscriber

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    Dear Stephanie,

    Good news (or bad??? ;>) ) You are in control of the contrast (and all the other things), not the film or developer. You should get good photos from any of the films available using the developers you have.

    Start here and concentrate on chapters 4-6: http://photography.cicada.com/zs/

    Neal Wydra
     
  4. Michel Hardy-Vallée

    Michel Hardy-Vallée Membership Council Council

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    Killer high contrat: Tech Pan in Dektol stock. Bulletproof. Below that, you can try ortho or document films, they can build up contrast pretty quick. With normal films, slow speed films like Efke 25, PanF+, Delta100 or TMAX 100 generously developed will do.
     
  5. RobC

    RobC Member

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    Koadk technical pan if you can still get any. But it may be tooooo contrasty.
     
  6. Contrastique

    Contrastique Member

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  7. Larry.Manuel

    Larry.Manuel Member

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    Agitate more, more time when developing.

    My first roll of 135 Delta 100, exposed at EI 50 was viciously contrasty after too much agitation and too much time in Rodinal 1+50. Trial and error - very reliable way to learn.

    First time: 9 1/4 minutes at 20C [68F[, constant agitation for first 30 sec, then 3 inversions every 30 sec. Overkill.

    Next time: 8 min, 20C, 3 inversions in first 30 sec, then one inversion per 30 sec. Much greater range of mid-tones, velvety silvers. Nice.

    My current practice: Gentle stirring for first 30 sec, then one back-and-forth with stir rod or one very gentle agitation per minute. 8 min, 20C 1+50.
     
  8. jim appleyard

    jim appleyard Member

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    Good answers guys, but not really what she was asking. To increase contrast you must: increase time in dev., increase agitation, increase dev temp., or all three.
     
  9. cotdt

    cotdt Member

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    TechPan or Adox CMS20 in pretty much any developer. even in low-contrast developers these films have a ton of contrast.
     
  10. CBG

    CBG Member

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    With HC-110 or Rodinal you can add the use of stronger concentrations of developer to time temperature and agitation.

    C
     
  11. IOS

    IOS Member

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    I have gotten strong contrast using Apx100 with hc-110 and high agitation.
     
  12. Michel Hardy-Vallée

    Michel Hardy-Vallée Membership Council Council

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    Yeah, that's pretty much what we said.

    All films will have higher contrat when developed longer, regardless of developer.
     
  13. Vaughn

    Vaughn Subscriber

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    I'll echo MHV and suggest copy film, if you don't mind the film being orthochromatic. Very responsive to increased development (by temp, time and agitation) as well as exposure. But it is not cheap either. Ilford make a nice one in sheets -- don't know if it is availible in rolls.

    I have used both Kodak and Ilford copy film with HC-110 and have been able to get as much contrast as one could possibly want...and more.

    Vaughn
     
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  15. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

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    If you want cheap high contrast the choice is Freestyles Lith film. Then you can read all the threads on reducing contrast -) For 4x5 look at the 3.9xsomething or other. The 4x5 is really 4x5.
     
  16. AgX

    AgX Member

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    Adox CMS20 is not available in type 120 or sheet film.
     
  17. Stephanie Brim

    Stephanie Brim Member

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    At the time they didn't know that. I forgot to mention that I was looking at films for larger formats. Sorry.
     
  18. Doug Webb

    Doug Webb Member

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    It is easy to get high contrast with Ilford Pan F, readily available in 120, but not 4x5. Just underexpose and overdevelop and the contrast skyrockets. This is true to a certain extent with any black and white film, but more so with 100 speed and slower films. If you are busy, as I am sure you are with a 4 month old, why not just try some film that you already have and just underexpose and overdevelop, if you get close to what you want just add a little more aggressive agitation.
    Good luck,
    Doug Webb
     
  19. Mike Wilde

    Mike Wilde Member

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    Affordable ortho option

    Consider Lith film - red blind, develop by inspection under safelight. ASA about 3-6 under daylight. When not developed in lith developer, it is capable of grey scale- consider a more dilute developer as a start , like HC-110b 1:1 .

    It is also very cheap - buy some 8x10, etc, and cut it down to 4x5 in your darkroom, just like paper under safelight. It is also very fun to use in manipulating images to high contrast in the darkroom at higher developer concentrations.
     
  20. ntenny

    ntenny Member

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    It's not? Phooey, I was just getting interested.

    Adox ORT 25 is available in both and can give nice contrasty results without extraordinary treatment. I've played with it in Diafine and Caffenol LC+C, which not unnaturally give very different contrast (example of each attached---the landscape is Diafine). Neither is at the extreme you see with something like Tech Pan, though.

    -NT
     

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  21. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    Well, I think that it's easy to make things way too difficult.

    If you want high contrast - develop your film longer. How much longer? Depends on how much extra contrast you want. Trial and error.

    - Thomas
     
  22. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

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    Why not just buy the precut 4x5 [3.9x 4 something or other] stuff and save the hassle?



    http://www.freestylephoto.biz/sc_prod.php?cat_id=&pid=1197
     
  23. AgX

    AgX Member

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    Yes, but it will produce also more fog and more grain.
    But as said, it's trial and error.
     
  24. Alan Johnson

    Alan Johnson Subscriber

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  25. Michel Hardy-Vallée

    Michel Hardy-Vallée Membership Council Council

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    If you want low grain, high contrast, and cheap, in 120 and 4x5, definitely go for either Efke 25, ADOX ORT 25 or Arista APHS. The ADOX is much cheaper than the Rollei.

    Ortho films can build up contrast until they're bulletproof, and grain just does not exist.
     
  26. cotdt

    cotdt Member

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    push any low ISO film a couple stops and you can get high contrast