Control, by Anton Corbijn

Discussion in 'Photographers' started by Michel Hardy-Vallée, Oct 20, 2007.

  1. Michel Hardy-Vallée

    Michel Hardy-Vallée Membership Council Council

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    Just went to see the Montréal premiere of Control, about Joy Division and Ian Curtis, and it's AWESOME! Gorgeous cinematography, and really good acting. I've always been a Joy Division fan, and it was as close as I could imagine about being in a show.

    The only thing is, I was perplexing myself throughout the movie: did they shoot on real B&W or did they desaturate color stock? The blacks had a slightly greenish tinge, which I'm tempted to equal with silver, but I can't be sure...
     
  2. Krockmitaine

    Krockmitaine Member

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    Thanks for the heads up.
    Same here, always liked their music.
    Unknown pleasures
    So good
    Now the trick is to get back to a civilised place asap and see the movie.
     
  3. Michael W

    Michael W Member

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    It was shot on Kodak colour neg Vision2 5217 200T
    It went to a digital internegative where the desaturation was done & was then printed to colour film for release, which would explain the cast you saw.
    http://www.cinematography.com/forum2004/index.php?showtopic=23014&hl=corbijn
    I got this from a thread at cinematography.com
    They tested B&W film but the grain was too heavy.
     
  4. Michel Hardy-Vallée

    Michel Hardy-Vallée Membership Council Council

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    Great, thanks for the thread link! The last B&W movie I saw was "Les amants réguliers", a French film about Mai 68, and it was definitely shot on real B&W (some of the stock was ORWO). The grain was very large, and it was rather mesmerizing to see the constant shifting clumps of graininess as the image moved.