Convert: Digital to Film

Discussion in 'Exposure Discussion' started by Nicole, Oct 2, 2004.

  1. Nicole

    Nicole Member

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    Hi everyone

    I am a convert, going from digital back to film - digital just doesn't compete unless you spend lots of 1000's $$$ every year to keep up with technology, and even then it's a big DUNNO!
    I have invested in a Nikon F90X 35mm (love the viewfinder!) and a Hasselblad 500c/m (oldies but goodies).

    The Hassie is my first medium format. :|

    Any tips and tricks on how best to shoot in film with either camera would be soooo much appreciated. I mostly shoot fine art and contemporary portraits (on location not studio) and love B&W but shoot in colour 'only' if necessary.

    Thanks very much and kind regards
    Nicole
     
  2. jovo

    jovo Membership Council Council

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    Hi and welcome. I think you'll find volumes of information among the threads here that should help you undertake your new direction with success. Best wishes for a happy and seamless immersion into the world of traditional photography.
     
  3. Fintan

    Fintan Member

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    welcome to APUG, i also use a 500cm, its a beautiful camera.
    What do you need to know, the manual is online here
     
  4. gr82bart

    gr82bart Subscriber

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  5. Ed Sukach

    Ed Sukach Member

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    Welcome from Ipswich, Massachusetts, USA, as well... from another enraptured Hasselblad user.
     
  6. TPPhotog

    TPPhotog Member

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    Hello again Nicole, Fire away the questions and there's going to be plenty of people ready and able to supply the answers :smile:
     
  7. georgeg

    georgeg Member

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    I have been using hasselblads for years. Great cameras. Learn to use the square format, If you like shooting portaits you will love this camera. Just beware they do not take a beating very well.
    georgeg
     
  8. Helen B

    Helen B Member

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    Hi Nicole, and welcome. Judging by the pictures you have posted in the gallery, you're not doing so bad!

    What kind of 'tips and tricks' are you looking for?

    Best,
    Helen
     
  9. Nicole

    Nicole Member

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    WOW, thank you all for such a warm welcome!

    OK, my first big mistake: I took my F90X (still working through the manual) to a shoot and forgot to change the ISO settings (eeek!) Film B&W TMax 400 but forgot ISO setting was at 1600. Now that could produce some 'artistic' results but in this case not a good thing. I was with another photographer who insisted I shoot in "P" mode (I always shoot on manual and so was thrown off balance here). I raised my concern - but didn't check the ISO. Silly me assumed in 'P' mode everything would be automatic, including ISO settings. I went along with this person's experience, since he has alot more than me. Now I'm panicking over the results that I won't get until next week from the lab.

    Well, first experience back in film and certainly have learnt a lesson. Don't rely on others, always do your own checking - and no matter how experienced the other may be - pipe up!!! And... get to know your equipment!!! :smile: Stuff everyone knows of course :smile:

    I might have to return to flying!!! (I studied for my commercial pilot licence with aerobatics and formation flying, before I got bored with it as it was not creative enough! So I got lost in the business world for a few years not knowing what to do before discovering my passion for photography :smile: Flying around Papua New Guinea was the most exciting part - should have had a camera back then!!!
     
  10. VoidoidRamone

    VoidoidRamone Subscriber

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    If you still have time, you could call the lab and see if they can push and pull film. Ask them to push your film 2 stops, your shots might be a little grainier, but it's better than getting back negs that are 2 stops underexposed! -Grant
     
  11. Cheryl Jacobs

    Cheryl Jacobs Member

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    Shannon, one major difference between digital and film, in terms of exposure. In digital, you tend to have to underexpose in order to not lose highlight detail, and then use your software to correct the tones as needed. With negative film, you have more latitude on the side of overexposure, since the detail on the neg can be burned into the print. Now, I'm not suggesting that you intentionally overexpose by six stops, but you do have take into account the latitude of the equipment you're using.

    Congratulations on "regressing"! :wink: Once you get your feet under you, you're going to feel right at home in the analogue world.
     
  12. Nicole

    Nicole Member

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    Thanks Cheryl :smile:
     
  13. JD Morgan

    JD Morgan Member

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    Tmax 400 @ 1600 is just fine processed at 68 deg. F. for 9.25 minutes in xtol, I just did one yesterday.

    Welcome.

    I'm a pilot too -- with time in the Aerobat. :wink:
     
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  15. Nicole

    Nicole Member

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    Hi JD, I spent too much money on aerobatics and formation flying so I struggled with my comm instrument rating, giggle.
    Unfortunately I don't process my own film - wouldn't know where to start. The lab has the film and I'll have to ring them first thing tomorrow (Mon) to double check the processing at 1600! Gee I hope it's ok.
     
  16. FrankB

    FrankB Member

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    Processing B&W film is exceptionally easy, cheap and gives you a lot more control than leaving it all to a lab. Very little equipment is needed and it is all very readily available (especially with a lot of people converting the other way at the moment!).

    If you're interested then any basic darkroom text will give you the information you need to get started and, of course, a couple of questions on APUG will fill in any blanks.

    All the best (and welcome to the analogue revolution! :wink: ),

    Frank
     
  17. Nicole

    Nicole Member

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    Thanks Frank! I'm curious to learn about processing my own, but I only have very limited space - actually only an office (with no sinks) which has a 'huge' window! With children I'm also reluctant to use the bathroom with all the chemicals at it is located directly off the kids bedrooms. What does everyone else do under these circumstances?
     
  18. SuzanneR

    SuzanneR Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    You can always get a dark bag to load film in the tanks, and if you have a sink in a laundry room someplace that's all you really need. You might take a class at a local college or look into places that rent darkroom space. Once you process your own film, you'll want to print as well. (Are you familiar with the "If you Give a Mouse a Cookie" books??) I have small children too, and all the chemicals are well sealed and in the basement. The darkroom is strictly off limits, and the door is usually locked. When I first started to get back into black and white, I shot a lot of chromgenic film, Ilford XP2 and Kodak T-400 CN, and had them commercially processed. I really didn't want the chemicals around before I had the darkroom. When I finally built the darkroom, I have to say, I've had some epic battles making the prints with those negs. A lot was overdeveloped. Now that I am processing my own film, half the battle for printing has been conquered. Good luck with it.
     
  19. Nicole

    Nicole Member

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    Hi Suzanne, thanks very much for the advice. I'd love to give it a go. Unfortunately our house is very small, no basements or attics in Australia, and we utilise every nook and cranny. I have a big back yard though :smile:
    For my laundry though - how mobile are these units?
    I'm often disappointed with the b&w photos I get back from the lab and I'm sure its not ALL due to pilot error.
    Suzanne, what's the other 'half the battle'?
     
  20. SuzanneR

    SuzanneR Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Hi Nicole,

    I was so disappointed with black and white prints back from the lab that I built the darkroom! Actually, the only battle was getting my overly contrasty and overly developed chromogenic film onto fiber paper. I have to say it's a pleasure to print from a well exposed and developed negative with minimum burning and dodging. There is way more latitude to make the prints expressive. Back yard is probably not the most practical :smile:, but what a nice place to be, rather than holed up in the pitch black of a darkroom. I must admit, I prefer the darkroom when the weather outside is lousy, and we have plenty of that in New England. Anyway, I think the darkroom rental may be the best bet for the moment, or a class. Or just use the bathroom when the kids are away, and keep the vent going.
    Cheers,
    Suzanne
     
  21. Nicole

    Nicole Member

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    Thanks Suzanne! :smile:
     
  22. JD Morgan

    JD Morgan Member

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    Well now, if ya hadn't spent the $$ for the concrete pad and 12x12 out-building in the backyard with the ventilator, garden hose fed sink with drain attachment to a large roll away motor home septic tank, etc. paying for all that dual time... :wink:

    Best bet in your situation if you have the exterior space is to acquire and old (you can find them free) travel trailer. Gut it down like a mobile office trailer and put counters and cabinets in as needed. Most will have the plumbing for hose hookup, septic holding tank and electric.

    If ya do it right, it can even remain mobile so you can take the darkroom with you on weekends to the mountains or ???
     
  23. Nicole

    Nicole Member

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    Giggle, JD you crack me up! :smile:) I have 4 old tin sheds out the backyard (not there's a thought) but in summer they can get beyond 50+ degrees celcius inside and not spider-proof either (eeek!) :smile:
     
  24. JD Morgan

    JD Morgan Member

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    Bury 'em below ground and dig a tunnel to your bathroom :D
     
  25. JD Morgan

    JD Morgan Member

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    Oh, 'scuse me.... I meant tunnel to your 'water closet' :D
     
  26. Nicole

    Nicole Member

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    There's no 'water closet' in my place JD! Australian's definitely have bathrooms. :smile: Bury 'em is definitely on my agenda - but my hubby likes them too much. You know, tools and stuff. How many sheds does one man need? :smile: