converting a shed into a darkroom

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by wilfbiffherb, Oct 28, 2013.

  1. wilfbiffherb

    wilfbiffherb Member

    Messages:
    310
    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2010
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
  2. r-brian

    r-brian Member

    Messages:
    617
    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2003
    Location:
    Albuquerque,
    I used a 9x13 shed at my old house as my darkroom. I did install an old kitchen sink and faucet and plumbed the cold water to the outside with a hose bib on the end. Just had to connect a hose from the house to the bib and had cold water for print washing. The drain was plumbed out to the grass. Also ended up installing a small AC unit in one of the windows because the New Mexico summers get really hot. It was a pain to get up and running but when I did, it work like a charm.
     
  3. mweintraub

    mweintraub Member

    Messages:
    1,336
    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2008
    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    How did you deal with warm water for warming chemicals / pre-wash / etc?
     
  4. MDR

    MDR Member

    Messages:
    1,411
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2006
    Location:
    Austria
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Nice, regarding the vent U shaped pipes, light can't travel around corners so use a sort of U shaped chimney made with plastic pipes or oven pipes, the pipes have to be painted dead matt on the inside. See att. for ideas. (note the pipes sizes are exagerated)

    ventilation.jpg
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 28, 2013
  5. grahamp

    grahamp Subscriber

    Messages:
    973
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2004
    Location:
    San Francisc
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Much the same as mine ( http://grahampatterson.home.comcast.net/~grahampatterson/grahamp/darkroom/darkroom.html ), though I had the building and just had to insulate and panel it.

    I find an electric kettle is more than adequate for warming up solutions. A litre or two of near boiling water goes a long way. I have a stainless steel jug that does a good job when stood in a bath of hot water.

    Having a Jobo for film work takes care of a lot the temperature issues. I also have a small space heater that can stabilize the temperature in the building in an hour or so. Not that it gets much below freezing in this part of California.

    Note about electric heat sources - watch your total wattage if you are using an extension or distribution block on the end of an extension. An RCD/GFCI device in the line would be wise as well.
     
  6. wilfbiffherb

    wilfbiffherb Member

    Messages:
    310
    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2010
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    All good suggestions here. no idea what an RCD/GFCI device is im afraid! For heating i use a jobo for film and a plate warmer for tray processing. its only an 8'x6' shed so it warms up pretty quickly on body heat alone.
     
  7. bobwysiwyg

    bobwysiwyg Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,623
    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2008
    Location:
    Ann Arbor, M
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Basically devices that detect ground faults, that is standing water a touching and electrical device or outlet. Could save your life. In the U.S. it is a code requirement within so many feet of a water source.. six feet I think.
     
  8. Terry Christian

    Terry Christian Subscriber

    Messages:
    699
    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2011
    Location:
    Memphis, TN
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    What Bob said. GFCI = Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter.

    It looks the same as a regular outlet except that it has a test button in the middle. If something goes wrong with the grounding, such as a short caused by moisture, current will immediately cease. If you don't already have them in your house, as long as you have a ground wire present you can replace your existing outlets with them -- easy to do.
     
  9. wilfbiffherb

    wilfbiffherb Member

    Messages:
    310
    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2010
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    ah ive got one of those built into my extension lead so should be ok hopefully
     
  10. Mainecoonmaniac

    Mainecoonmaniac Subscriber

    Messages:
    3,987
    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2009
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    It's pure genius! If you want something bad enough, once can figure out a solution. My friend is an avid outdoorsman and he has a kayaks and other items he stores in his Tough Shed. He told me it's not that expensive and it's assembled pretty quickly.

    http://tuffshed6.reachlocal.net/
     
  11. grahamp

    grahamp Subscriber

    Messages:
    973
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2004
    Location:
    San Francisc
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    RCD = Residual Current Detector. I used to use a plugin one when I lived in the UK. For the darkroom in the US I replaced the primary socket (outlet) in the building with a GFCI one.
     
  12. r-brian

    r-brian Member

    Messages:
    617
    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2003
    Location:
    Albuquerque,
    Actually the 'cold' water in New Mexico is right around 68-70 F most of the year. In fact, in the summer I have to add ice to get it down.
     
  13. Simonh82

    Simonh82 Member

    Messages:
    252
    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2011
    Location:
    London, Unit
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
  14. wilfbiffherb

    wilfbiffherb Member

    Messages:
    310
    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2010
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Very nice! Just pick yourself up a cheap secondhand shed. i got mine for very little and it had a decent floor already put down into it. My greatest cost was insulating and paneling the walls.
     
  15. Black Dog

    Black Dog Member

    Messages:
    3,220
    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2003
    Location:
    Eight miles high
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Thanks for the rubble sack tip and well done!