converting enlarger from condensor to diffusor

Discussion in 'Enlarging' started by Peter de Groot, May 8, 2009.

  1. Peter de Groot

    Peter de Groot Member

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    Hi,

    I have a Meopta magnitarus enlarger. It is a condensor enlarger but it has the wrong size condensor lens and one of those has a crack in it. I am thinking of converting it to a diffusor enlarger. Is it enough to raplace the condensor for a plat of frosted glass? Or do I have have to replace the light as well?
    I have tried the search function but did see a topic answering these questions. Any help would be appreciated.

    Thanks.
     
  2. MartinP

    MartinP Member

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    From your name I guess you are in NL ? It would be cheaper, quicker and easier to look in Marktplaats and pick up a new-ish, free/cheap Meopta Opemus. They are very commonly sold these days. If you mean Magnifax, then they are less common but there are plenty of 6x7 / 6x9 alternatives. These days people seem to be almost giving away doka gear :-/

    The Meoptas are generally well made and the company still stocks spares for a lot of models, so that is another option. The general answer to your exact question is no, as you will need a mixing box and a very different design of enlarger head in order to get even lighting across the field.
     
  3. Anscojohn

    Anscojohn Subscriber

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    I know someone who replaced the condensor head on his Opemus with an Arista-grid cold light. It worked fine.
     
  4. resummerfield

    resummerfield Subscriber

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    I experimented with my Durst 8x10 Condenser head, to see what quality diffusion I could obtain. I tried several methods--

    1) First I removed the condensers and substituted a simple diffuser, such as 1/8-inch white plexi. The resulting light was so dim as to be unusable. By substituting a very thin diffuser (1/16-inch plexi), I was able to make a print, but the light was very uneven, with hotspots.

    2) Next I placed the 1/8-inch white plexi beneath the existing 8x10 condensers. This resulted in a brighter light which I could use to make a print, but still the light was very uneven, with hotspots.

    3) Finally, I installed an Aristo head. As you can imagine, the Aristo head was by far the best method.
     
  5. Peter de Groot

    Peter de Groot Member

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    Thanks all for the responses. I will look for some more info and prises for an Aristo cold light.

    Kind regards,

    Peter
     
  6. RalphLambrecht

    RalphLambrecht Subscriber

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    I'll stay away from cold lights as far as I can!
     
  7. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

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  8. frotog

    frotog Member

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    You were so close with method number two. You should have tried some lighting diffusion like lee or rosco full white or half white (216 and 251 if I remember correctly). Oh... and make sure your light source is properly positioned in the xyz adjustable coordinates. If you're not sure, try making a print of just the light source in the same way ic-racer did with his aristo. Once you get the bulb positioning spot on then you place the diffusion under the condenser set. Most plexi has inconsistencies in the grain of the plastic. High-end diffusion like the Lee or Rosco product does not. Hint - make sure the diffusion lays flat and in a parallel plane with the condensers (I tape mine to the bottom condenser). BTW, I've never seen an Aristo or any "cold light" capable of producing an even, diffused source. Boggles my mind that people are willing to pay top dollar for them.