Cutting negatives into strips.

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by fastw, Aug 7, 2012.

  1. fastw

    fastw Member

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    I always cut into the frames. What's the best way to do it?
     
  2. technowizard12

    technowizard12 Member

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    I just go with very sharp, very thin scissors. That way, I can see what I'm doing.

    You can also use an x-acto and ruler on a cutting mat.
     
  3. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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  4. fastw

    fastw Member

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    Will try.
     
  5. kanzlr

    kanzlr Subscriber

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  6. perkeleellinen

    perkeleellinen Member

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    Place your negs over a sheet of white paper, make sure there's good light, use a sharp pair of scissors and go slow.
     
  7. darkosaric

    darkosaric Subscriber

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    +1

    Strong light, cotton gloves, white background, sharp thin scissors, patience :smile:.
     
  8. fastw

    fastw Member

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    Thanks all.

    Those two gadgets look good.
     
  9. wildbill

    wildbill Member

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    I use the dr.t film cutter as well. When I asked the same question (for the same reason) I got the "use scissors and patience" response as well. Labs use a cutter, why shouldn't I. Less errors, especially with frames that are close together on curly film.
     
  10. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Member

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    Look for Fiskars shears (with mightily sharp needle points) and do the cut over a bright lightbox. Steady, confident hands will do it. Of course less of a margin for stuff ups when cutting 35mm than 120.

    Fiskars can be bought from hobby shops that have stuff for sewing. I have had mine for more than 15 years.

    Fullscreen capture 8082012 91357 PM.jpg

    Lab operators are not necessarily deadly accurate, as witnesseth a lab chopping through the last frame of a roll of 120 film! I had plenty to say (none of it repeatable here). I've never cut through or ruined any of my own trannies. Just my fingers...
     
  11. DarkroomDan

    DarkroomDan Subscriber

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    +1 Surgical scissors and a lightbox
     
  12. bdial

    bdial Subscriber

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    The lab type cutters are as accurate as the positioning. If care is taken in that part, they do fine, but so do scissors.
    I like to use a cheap Fiskars plastic paper trimmer on a light box. It's overkill but it works nicely, and even tricky situations like too-close negative spacing are easy to deal with.
     
  13. David Brown

    David Brown Subscriber

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    Geez, I can't believe this is even a problem. Enough light and a good, sharp pair of scissors.
    This is another "I can't load steel/plastic reels" thing. Nobody can the first time. Just takes some patience and a little practice. :smile:
     
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  15. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    Sharp scissors and a light box. Never managed to botch a negative yet.
    Like David I'm a bit surprised this is even an issue.
     
  16. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    One of the reasons I like the cutter I recommended is that only one of my two hands is capable of either accurately holding film still or cutting film with scissors

    A "guillotine" type cutter solves that problem - my weaker hand is quite capable of handling the blade. A rotary cutter will also work.

    The "Dr. T" film cutter adds the translucent base, guides that hold the film straight and distance markers, so it works even better than a plain "guillotine" type cutter, especially with slide film.
     
  17. fastw

    fastw Member

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    Just started scanning, didn't have to cut for enlarger.
     
  18. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

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    I use a battle axe to cut my negatives!:laugh:

    Jeff
     
  19. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    I'd like to see that. Will a machete do?
     
  20. Marc Akemann

    Marc Akemann Subscriber

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    As long as it's sharp!

    I use scissors. :smile:
     
  21. tron_

    tron_ Member

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    I use my teeth and then cauterize the edges with a torch.

    Just kidding, I set the negatives on a white piece of paper, then use my metal scale and x-acto knife.
     
  22. kb3lms

    kb3lms Subscriber

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  23. jglass

    jglass Subscriber

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    I just wonder if dragging the negs through those cutter devices will scratch them (the negatives) in a serious way. Of course, cutting w/ scissors on a light box or white paper presents the same danger in some ways.
     
  24. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

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    :laugh::laugh::laugh:

    Jeff
     
  25. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    Matt, that's a really good point that I did not consider. I actually want to apologize for overlooking the possibility of having a physical impediment to using the tools I am used to. Thanks for the reminder.
     
  26. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

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    Like others, I find this post amazing. Without meaning to be personal, perhaps you need reading glasses. This is not a question of kit or special cutting devices, just correct observation and a sharp pair of sissors.