D or E

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by Curt, Oct 10, 2013.

  1. Curt

    Curt Subscriber

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    I went out to the darkroom and opened the valves on my hot and cold supply. I have an old Kodak Dial Mixing valve with vacuum breakers on both incoming lines. As I increased the flow to get the temperature up there was a bang bang bang! Water shot out wildly all over the room and I was soaked. So what's the point of all of this?

    Im tired of wandering temperatures and the constant checking and resetting. Anyone who has one of these dinosaurs knows what I'm talking about. It may be great for a riverboat engineer who needs something to do but not a darkroom worker.

    Its finally time time to get a Hass Intellifaucet. The question is which model, D or E? Same price $$$.

    I haven't found a better unit. Tell me about yours.

    Curt
     
  2. Lopaka

    Lopaka Member

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    I have had a D series for about 8 years and have no complaints. Temp control is accurate enough for critical color work.
    Bob
     
  3. Curt

    Curt Subscriber

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    Bob, thanks, the only difference I see in the two models is the addition of all cold and all hot at the ends of the range.
     
  4. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Curt, do your input lines (going into the valve) have a key adjustment? There is one for H and one for C.

    If so, these may be of help. You have to adjust them in some circumstances and also bleed the lines of air.

    PE
     
  5. Ken Nadvornick

    Ken Nadvornick Member

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    Curt, wise move. I have a K250 and have never regretted the expense.

    Don't know exacly where you are in the PNW, but out here in the Monroe/Sultan area (Spada Lake watershed) my ambient cold water temperature never rises above about 66-67F during the hottest weeks of the year. That means I have the luxury of perfectly tempered (68F) water available year-round. Beats the heck out of the darkroom I had decades ago in Southern California where the summer water was 84-86F.

    My recommendation might be the 'D' model because of the preset temperature breakpoints that are configured to the commonly used photographic standards on the Fahrenheit scale. On the 'E' model they are set to even 5-degree Fahrenheit breakpoints only.

    Note that the 'D' model has a setting for 68F, while the 'E' does not.

    'D' Model
    °F: 65, 68, 70, 72, 75, 80, 86, 90, 95, 98, 100, 102, 104, 105, 115
    °C: 18.3, 20, 21.1, 22.2, 23.9, 26.7, 30, 32.2, 35.0, 36.7, 37.8, 38.9, 40, 40.6, 46.1

    'E' Model
    °F: COLD, 55, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80, 85, 90, 95, 100, 105, 110, 115, HOT
    °C: COLD, 12.8, 15.6, 18.3, 21.1, 23.9, 26.7, 29.4, 32.2, 35.0, 37.8, 40.6, 43.3, 46.1, HOT

    Ken
     
  6. Curt

    Curt Subscriber

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    After I sat down and thought about it I realized I had drained the lines to work on the shop plumbing. Are the key adjustments on the incoming vacuum valves, back flow preventers, I've gone through them for maintenance. Once the air was purged I was fine. Had a nice developing session.
     
  7. Curt

    Curt Subscriber

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    Ron, thanks,

    Ken, I didn't see the missing 68 degree stop or notice the increments. I was thinking about the present unit. The Model D appears to be the one. All cold and all hot can come off the incoming lines. I'm making carbon prints so the hot only is needed. The cold only water too. In Everett the water is very clean and consistent. It's a little warmer in the summer but that's ok.
     
  8. Ken Nadvornick

    Ken Nadvornick Member

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    Then you are also supplied from Spada Lake. When I first moved here in 1989 the water was simply drawn from the lake, filtered, and sent directly to my tap. Best water I ever tasted. It's chlorinated now though. Still good, but not as tasty. I'd bet the trip across Ebey Island in those above-ground main supply pipes along the Highway 2 trestle is where it's heating up a bit in the summer.

    If you do go the Intellifaucet route, consider filtering both your hot and cold lines upstream of the unit. Dave Hass told me it saves wear and tear on the solenoid-driven valves. He said the units are designed to last damn near forever, but that when they do fail it's almost always the valves.

    He also said filtering down to 10-microns was sufficient, but I've always used 1-micron filters. They don't cost any more, don't clog too quickly since the water is so clean already, and give me some peace of mind for protection of the expensive investment. I've been using my K250 maintenance-free for 10+ years without a single problem.

    If you're interested, I have a local source in Snohomish that orders the 1-micron cartridges for me, since most places don't normally carry them.

    Good luck.

    Ken
     
  9. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Curt, best wishes. I hope your problem is solved. The key adjustments are on each incoming line and are part of the valve.

    PE
     
  10. Curt

    Curt Subscriber

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    Thank you Ron,

    My unit was in use for twenty years on an X-Omat processor. It's been good but it does have its moments. Newer isn't always better but the Intellifaucet is.

    Curt
     
  11. Curt

    Curt Subscriber

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    Ken, I spoke with David Hass a few years ago, I should have bought one then. My question was about shutting the flow off and how long it would take to respond again. It's fairly quick was the answer. If conservation wasn't an issue I'd leave the water running.

    Our water is the best I've tasted. I'm a native and have always expected it. The treated water isn't my favorite but my dentist keeps telling me to drink it instead of bottled water.

    I don't have filters now in the darkroom. When I get a new control unit I'll put in a pair. I'll let you know when I do it. In less than a month I'm going to the George Eastman House for a carbon transfer workshop with Mark Osterman. He and Ron along with others teach there. It's going to be my first visit and I'm looking forward to it. After I return I'm plumbing in a new unit, changing the sink arrangement and moving out an enlarger and moving in my Durst 5x7. In the process I'm having separate wet and a dry areas. My darkroom is small. It's off a larger room that's getting finished as my studio. I have a nice sized bathroom too. A full size stairway takes a huge chunk of real estate out of a second floor room. So much work to do in this space! Having a first floor shop is handy. I need to get it squared away to. I've been working on the house.