Dagor with flange cemented to the front

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by JamesMadison, Mar 31, 2009.

  1. JamesMadison

    JamesMadison Member

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    I recently bought a dagor because I got a really good price on it. The reason I got a really good price on it, is because the flange is cemented to the front of the lens where the lens hood should be.

    My questions are:

    1) Why did somebody do this. For projection? It doesn't seem to cover more than when facing correctly. It only seems to have more exagerated distortion on the edges.

    2) How do I get this darn thing off?
     
  2. jimgalli

    jimgalli Subscriber

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    I think the Goerz Dagor was a perfectly symmetrical pair. As my wife would say, a "push me pull you". It shouldn't make a dimes worth of difference which way it's facing.

    I'll let someone else answer your other questions......:confused:

    Leave it that way. What a great conversation starter at the workshops.

    What if you get it off and discover it's the wrong flange for that lens and it won't fit, but it would work ok if you glued it on the other end? Sounds like something a photographer would do.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 31, 2009
  3. Steve Hamley

    Steve Hamley Member

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    1. The most logical reason might be that the rear threads on the barrel are messed up. Are they O.K.?

    2. This one I don't really know. Strong solvents or heat might damage the cement in the cell. If the rear threads are fine, it might have to be cut out by a machinist, which would destroy a good bit of your savings. Any idea what kind of glue?

    Good luck, Steve
     
  4. archphoto

    archphoto Member

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    Basicly, if you can remove the lenses, aperture and everything that could be damaged by either solvents or heat that should be a start.

    Next I would put the part with the flange in boiling water and see what happens.
    You will need 2 oven-mittens to protect jour hands.

    I would not put a burner to it or put it on an electric heater element.

    Expect discoloring of the brass and I realy think this is a complete restauration project to start out with.
    You might have a look at the Large Format Forum, there are a couple of threads about it.

    Good luck and be carefull,

    Peter
     
  5. JamesMadison

    JamesMadison Member

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    thanks guys.

    I did a better test to check out the coverage, and I couldn't tell any difference. I'm just going to leave it and use it as is until I get more feedback.
     
  6. archphoto

    archphoto Member

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    Maybe you could post some pic's of the lens and the part that seems to be glued. It might give a better insight in what is wrong with the lens.

    Thanks,
    Peter
     
  7. walter23

    walter23 Subscriber

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    Maybe someone mounted it behind a board and had some kind of front mounted shutter in front?
     
  8. freygr

    freygr Member

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    If the flange does not affect the image, why try to remove it. My farther said "if it's working don't fix it".

    But if you must, remember if it is supper glue, you will need to get it hot before the glue will brake down. If it is glued to the out side you can cut it but you have to be very careful not to cut into the lens housing.