darkroom chemistry bottle solutions

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by phillip2446, Apr 14, 2013.

  1. phillip2446

    phillip2446 Member

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    hi

    i am trying to figure out what i can store chemistry in.
    like say d76 or other chemicals like fixer.

    can i use soda bottles or juice bottles to store the chemistry in?
    i believe they are pete bottles.

    any advice would be appreciated

    cheers
     
  2. Mark Fisher

    Mark Fisher Subscriber

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    PETE or glass has the lowest oxygen permeability. With glass being best. It is really most important with developer.
     
  3. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    Look for a "1" in the recycle triangle symbol or the letters PETE just under it .
     
  4. jeffreyg

    jeffreyg Subscriber

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    Brown glass pharmacy bottles can't be beat. I've been using the same ones for almost forty years. Check with your pharmacist he may give you some. That's how I got mine and they have calibrating lines to boot.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/
     
  5. fotch

    fotch Member

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    Several years ago I tried several pharmacy's and they all said everything now comes in plastic.
     
  6. 131802

    131802 Member

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    Several threads on APUG address this issue. The take-home message was that there's no need for brown glass unless you store your developer in direct sunlight. Mine's in the dark closet that I call my darkroom. D76 gets stored in one-liter mason jars.One-shot developers like HC110 completely avoid the storage problem because the unmixed syrup lasts a really long time.
     
  7. johnielvis

    johnielvis Member

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    quart beer bottles with screw on caps. Green or brown. They are designed to keep the beer safe from the harms of light and will do your developer just as well.

    take the labels off or put x's on them lest you grab one when you're all out of beer and swig a bit of dev.
     
  8. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

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    I have always used plastic soda bottles that you can squeeze to minimise air and empty wine boxes with bags. Just remove the tap with a flat bladed knife, wash it out and re-use. You even get a spring loaded tap and if you reverse the box inside out and label as such, you wont drink it by mistake.
     
  9. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    The danger of reusing bottles that contained food or drink is that someone might mistake the contents for food or drink.

    PE has strongly argued this point in many threads over the years and I agree with him.
     
  10. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

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    You remove the label, relabel with the chemical they contain and don't keep them in your domestic fridge. No problem.
     
  11. fotch

    fotch Member

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    Without trying to be argumentative or tell someone they are wrong, there is a big advantage to getting the proper bottles.

    Accidents can & do happen. That is why they are called accidents. Any reasonable steps to prevent accidents is prudent. Even though you may not need brown in the bottle to protect the ingredients, it does kind of warn people there is something different, unless it is in the shape and color of a familiar drink, like beer.

    It is just cheap insurance to get bottles that look like chemical bottles. JMHO
     
  12. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

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    I take your point, but would say plastic is a safer material than glass, as it is more likely to bounce than smash.
     
  13. fotch

    fotch Member

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    Plastic can break although a lot less likely. I have not dropped a bottle of anything or broke a bottle from an accident in 50 years. Just lucky I guess.
     
  14. wilfbiffherb

    wilfbiffherb Member

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    Go to your local brewers supplies store. i got a box of 24 1ltr plastic bottles for £10.
     
  15. Jonathan R

    Jonathan R Member

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    If you can find a laboratory supplier online, or someone with access to one, brown glass bottles (known as 'Winchesters', at least in the UK) are surprisingly cheap and last a lifetime, as someone already said. You are more likely to break your foot than the bottle if you drop one. I replace airseals in the lids every time I put new chemicals in - I cut these from the silvered plastic tabs used to seal milk containers.
     
  16. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    I have never dropped a bottle, glass or plastic, full or empty in the darkroom. I have however started developing film with PhotoFlo. :redface:
     
  17. DannL

    DannL Member

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    Those plastic brown 32oz Hydrogen Peroxide bottles have served me well. The bottles with Hydrogen Peroxide may cost less than the same style bottle at a photo supplier. For 1 gallon size plastic bottles I have used empty windshield washer fluid bottles. The wall thickness of those bottles (jugs) is extra thick.

    I would not recommend the 1 gallon plastic milk jugs. The jugs I tried are very thin-walled. I had one develop a pinhole. I found a big mess days later.
     
  18. binglebugbob

    binglebugbob Subscriber

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    Storing toxic chemicals in soda or juice bottles or any other food container is NOT a good idea.

    Small children finding them easily could be poisoned. Personally, I wouldn't want to have to explain how it happened.
     
  19. flatulent1

    flatulent1 Subscriber

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    I've always heard that Boston Rounds were popular for storing photo chemicals. I use an assortment of lab bottles and square Fiji water bottles, well-marked of course.
     
  20. bobwysiwyg

    bobwysiwyg Subscriber

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    I prefer starting with fixer myself.n:blink::smile: