Dating old Kodachrome 35mm cassette

Discussion in 'Antiques and Collecting' started by Rich Borutta, Sep 19, 2012.

  1. Rich Borutta

    Rich Borutta Member

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    Can any one help me date this film?
    I picked up an Argus A2 at a flea market the other day. Inside was a roll of Kodachrome that had
    only a few exposures made on it. The cassette is solid yellow with small black writing on it.
    There is no Kodak logo or speed rating such as Weston, ASA or DIN or expiration date.
    There is only the 18 exposure specification and the Patent number.
    Here are a few shots of it.

    Thanks,
    Rich
     

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  2. BMbikerider

    BMbikerider Member

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    Now that IS old! That type of cassette was in use in the early 6o's (Prior to 1961) when I started with photography. I think the later crimped type in general use today gradually came into use around 1970 or so.
     
  3. Karl K

    Karl K Subscriber

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    With all due respect to BMbikerider, I must disagree with his dating estimate.
    Kodachrome rolls of 18 exposures were introduced at the very beginning of the 35mm Kodachrome lifecycle, around 1936-1937.
    You have in your hands, Rich, a glorious piece of photographic history.
    Here is what the outside box looked like.
    I hope someday that you will find an original box and complete the package.
    Best of luck.
    Karl
     

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  4. Steve Roberts

    Steve Roberts Member

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    I've got several Kodachrome packs dating back to 1937 but they're still sealed boxes and so I suppose I'll never get to see what's inside!

    Steve
     
  5. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    I only date good looking women.
     
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  6. DWThomas

    DWThomas Subscriber

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    I started shooting Kodachrome in 1958 and I don't recall ever seeing any cartridges like that. Looks like a nifty bit of history there!
     
  7. BMbikerider

    BMbikerider Member

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    Sorry I didn't make myself clear. I started around 1961 with photography so cannot say what took place before that with film cassettes. I remeber those well because they were re-usable for bulk film and not 'throw away' like they are today. I actually had to BUY re-usable cassettes when they stopped using this design and went over to the crimped type.
     
  8. Karl K

    Karl K Subscriber

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    Steve, if you ever think about parting with just one of them, kindly contact me via PM.
    Thanks,
    Karl
     
  9. Steve Roberts

    Steve Roberts Member

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    Unlikely, Karl, as they're different dates and variations of box design. I bought them some years ago for pennies when they were just very old, outdated films. I have about 50 different old and not-so-old 35mm films in their boxes that form a colourful and (to me) interesting display that reminds me of days gone by when you could walk into any photo shop and be spoiled for choice!
    Steve
     
  10. Karl K

    Karl K Subscriber

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    Understood...OK, second choice, how about posting some photos of your boxed-film display?
     
  11. Steve Roberts

    Steve Roberts Member

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    I'll have to negotiate to borrow my other half's d****al camera to do that! I had a careful look at the films last night. The earliest was not, as I said, 1937 but 1939 and there are five spanning the years to 1952 - I think three are Type A emulsions. I also have a few boxes from the 60s and 70s up to the very last style sold in the UK, though of course there are plenty of those around. Another item is a shrink-wrap sealed brick of 20 110 format Kodachrome 64 films from the 1970s. Most of these were bought in the days when everyone thought that Kodachrome would be with us for ever and so no-one put any value on old or outdated film.

    Steve
     
  12. Rich Borutta

    Rich Borutta Member

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    Thanks everyone for your help. It looks like the film was loaded into the Argus A2B when the camera was new and never used. It's amazing that the camera just stayed in a box somewhere for over 70 years. As per the track record of Argus cameras, the unit just needed a little dusting off and it seems to work fine. I'll run some contemporary film through it soon just to see how the pictures look. The lens doesn't appear to have coatings so the pictures should have an antique appearance that I struggle with Photoshop to reproduce on modern images.

    I plan to test the extinction meter and compare it to my Gossen meter readings and determine just how much of our modern technology is necessary for taking good pictures.
     
  13. Rich Borutta

    Rich Borutta Member

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    Thanks everyone for your help. It looks like the film was loaded into the Argus A2B when the camera was new and never used. It's amazing that the camera just stayed in a box somewhere for over 70 years. As per the track record of Argus cameras, the unit just needed a little dusting off and it seems to work fine. I'll run some contemporary film through it soon just to see how the pictures look. The lens doesn't appear to have coatings so the pictures should have an antique appearance that I struggle with Photoshop to reproduce on modern images.

    I plan to test the extinction meter and compare it to my Gossen meter readings and determine just how much of our modern technology is necessary for taking good pictures.