Dead meter on Olympus Trip...

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by eubielicious, Jul 16, 2006.

  1. eubielicious

    eubielicious Member

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    Hi all,

    I have an old Olympus Trip 35 tucked away, the problem is that the meter doesn't work. I've read here and there about the selenium failing over time causing the meter also to fail, what I'd like to know is if anyone has a way of bringing this back to life... or if it's curtains for this camera.

    Thanks,


    Euan
     
  2. naturephoto1

    naturephoto1 Subscriber

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    Euan,

    There may be replacement meters still available for the camera. If there are, a repairman may be able to install the replacement in the camera.

    Rich
     
  3. cdholden

    cdholden Member

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    Euan,
    I'm not sure how much it's worth to you via time or money, but you could get a repair tech to do it or take a crack it yourself. I found a site that shows the process of replacing it with a solar cell on an old Zenit... not quite the Olympus, but it gives you somewhere to start if you're handy with tools.
    Check out this link and scroll down the left until you find Camera Articles and Reapir Info, then choose Zenit Repair Project.
    Best of luck.
    Chris
     
  4. Mike Kennedy

    Mike Kennedy Member

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    Hi Euan,
    It will probably cost more $$ than it's worth to have it repaired. There seem to be lots of them around.
    The Trip syncs. at 1/40 of a second when not set on automatic so you could always follow the sunny 16 / cloudy 8 rule.
    How are the shutter blades? Any oil?

    Check out Matts Classic Cameras for lots of info. and links for your Trip.

    Cheers,
    Mike
     
  5. eubielicious

    eubielicious Member

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    I had a feeling that the cost would be prohibitive, given that they seem to be going on ebay for less than a tenner these days. Perhaps I could cannibalise this one and turn it into a pinhole camera?

    Euan
     
  6. Gerald Koch

    Gerald Koch Member

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    The selenium cell curves around the lens and it would be very hard to form a new one.

    The Trip is a very nice pocket camera with a very sharp Zuiko lens. They often appear on ebay.
     
  7. laudrup

    laudrup Member

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    Arghhhh It's a real shame that the Trip appears to have bitten the dust...i really love mine. It's a great little camera.

    Mike's tip seems like food for thought ,It'd be worth trying the sunny 16 rule and seeing what the results are like.

    I was pleased to pick that up, I'll give it a go myself, thanks Mike!
     
  8. Chan Tran

    Chan Tran Member

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    You can buy a brand new meter to use with it.
     
  9. Gerald Koch

    Gerald Koch Member

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    This camera uses a very primitive needle capture mechanism to set both the shutter speed and the aperture. Setting it for manual (flash) mode would give you only 1 shutter speed and is not a very satisfactory solution.
     
  10. Chan Tran

    Chan Tran Member

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    Checking around on the web and I found that the trip35 has 2 shutter speeds when in auto mode. 1/200 and 1/40. If it's in manual mode only 1/40 speed is possible but the entire range of aperture from 2.8 to 16 can be selected. I don't think this is too much of a loss. There is a web page http://alspix.blog.co.uk/index.php/alspix/2006/02/12/ that show you how to modify the trip35 to select the high speed of 1/200.
     
  11. Chan Tran

    Chan Tran Member

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    Checking around on the web and I found that the trip35 has 2 shutter speeds when in auto mode. 1/200 and 1/40. If it's in manual mode only 1/40 speed is possible but the entire range of aperture from 2.8 to 16 can be selected. I don't think this is too much of a loss. There is a web page http://alspix.blog.co.uk/index.php/alspix/2006/02/12/ that show you how to modify the trip35 to select the high speed of 1/200.
     
  12. Gerald Koch

    Gerald Koch Member

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    That certainly makes for a better solution. Thanks for the info.
     
  13. Mike Wilde

    Mike Wilde Member

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    Dead Trip 35 meter circuit rehabbed successfully

    I was aiding my sister in law pack up her apartment for a move, and she gave me an Olympus Trip 35, saying that 'it doesnt work anymore'. Well, once home, I searched the web, saw that it had a bit of a following, and a good lens. She bought it in 68-70 time frame, and replaced it in 75. I usually dont keep 'dead' stuff around that long.

    I though 'why not see what is dead'. A bit of disasembly (no better way to learn than on a dead camera, right?) revealed:

    The selenium cell leads were glued in place, so taking that apart is of no use in cleaning the cell contacts with an eraser as some had suggested for bringing back demised selenium cells.

    There was a wire that had come out of the end of a litlle resistor that must be used to adjust the ensitivity of the cell and meter circuit. I untwisted the little knot of wiring all this happend in, and found that there was a sleeve that could be slipped aside to byass the resistor and touch the loose lead against the feed directly from the selenuim cell. I pointed the camera to a light source (I was doing at night in the basement), and the meter needle moved well with even the limited light. So there was still hope.

    I just needed to figure out the value of the unmarked gray bodied resistor, and replace it. My VOM meter lead could not make contact with whatever was left of the broken off end of the resistor, by poking a thin lead down the clear shrink wrap sleeve leading to the broken end. On a whim I thought to try to poke the broken off lead back into the end of the resistor ( and measure the resistance from the meter end of this wire) and low and behold -the circuit began to make a relaible connectionas long as the wire stayed pushed into the end of the resistor. It worked!! The the connection was re-established.

    The whole mess of wires where this had happened was neatly blu-tacked into place to dissuade the flaky resistor connection from openning up again.

    On re-assembly until the last top screw by the winder end goes in you can still pry up the top to see the meter move to verify that the meter circuit was still working after all wiring was packed.

    I shot a test roll, to verify that the selenium has enough umph to correctly drive the meter in real world conditions. I was a little unsure about how to re-install the film speed shutter that regulates how much of the selenuim cell gets exposed to the light, relative to the setting on the ASA dial, so there may be some fine tuning there, if the shot roll does not seem to be exposed properly.

    Otherwise I now have another working camera. My wife just rolled here eyes when I told her. I might relegate this one to sit in the glove box in an insulated lunch bag pre-loaded with HP5/TriX for those .. wish I had a camera with me... moments