Developer and times for Agfa Isopan Super Special?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by polyglot, Jul 26, 2009.

  1. polyglot

    polyglot Member

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    I was at a photomarket this morning and saw an exposed 120 roll labelled Agfa Isopan ISS / Isopan Super Special. Swapped it for the 35 cents in my pocket and am now wondering how I should develop it... I get only one go at this I think as I don't really want to cut it up. And I don't have some way of making it light-tight again after transferring a clip to the daylight tank.

    I have on hand plenty of D-76, Rodinal and maybe enough LC-29 to make up a 1+29 batch.

    A spot of googling tells me it's an ISO100 film designed in the 1940s or 1950s and that one can develop it in D-76... but recommended times vary from "do the same as FP4 and maybe add 20%", to 12 minutes in stock or even 25:00/18C at unspecified dilution. One site notes that the slightest overcooking will result in unusably thick negs.

    Any suggestions or links to something definitive? Anyone actually used this themselves?
     
  2. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Back in the 60's I used a few rolls of this film, dev times were similar to FP4, which is what you've found via Google. With these older films it's best to give a little extar to boost the contrast hence the add 20% extra dev time.

    I have just found times for ISS in BJP Almanac 1954 & 1961 and they are 9 minutes in ID-11/D76 for roll film, no temperatures been given but it'll be 20°C

    Ian
     
  3. polyglot

    polyglot Member

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    I guess that's 9:00 in stock? FP4 says 8:30 in 1+0 and 11:00 in 1+1, so how about I give it 13:30 in 1+1?
     
  4. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Sounds about right, my negatives were on 35mm in Agfa Rapid cassettes, as square 35mm easy loding system, the camear wasn't too brilliant.

    Ian
     
  5. polyglot

    polyglot Member

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    Well, it developed OK. Nothing interesting on the film though - not even a recognisable object or person. Just swirls of density as if someone had waved a fluorescent light around in front of a long exposure. Also looks like it was taken on a 6x6 toy camera - uneven frame spacing, light leaks, etc.

    Sadly, no images of Harold Holt disappearing into the surf or anything (we don't have a grassy knoll here in AU).