Developer for Kodak TMAX-100

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Jim Moore, May 14, 2004.

  1. Jim Moore

    Jim Moore Member

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    I am going to do some film speed/development tests this weekend on Kodak TMAX 100 film. (120 Size) I have never used any of the TMAX films.

    I was wondering if you could share your choice of developer for this film.

    I have Kodak XTOL and HC110 in my darkroom, but I'm willing to purchase something else (like Kodak TMAX-RS) if it gives better results.

    Thanks in advance!!

    Jim
     
  2. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    D-76 (1+1). This is the developer that T-Max films were originally tested with. Plain old D-76. Here's a good piece on the subject:

    http://mywebpages.comcast.net/hmpi/Misc/Bascom/bascom.htm

    Here's a sample image from TMX, 35mm, in D-76 (1+1). If you participate in the Postcard Exchange, I sent it as a postcard as well.:

    [​IMG]

    Here's one from 120 TMX/D-76 (1+1):

    [​IMG]

    and here's one from an 8x10" TMX/D-76 (1+1):

    [​IMG]
     
  3. bmac

    bmac Member

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    I used Hc110 Dil B with Tmax 100 for years in 35mm. I rated it at 80 and dev for -20% of the published times.
     
  4. david b

    david b Member

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    From the third edition of the "film developing cookbook" page 50:

    "XTOL is now the developer most highly recommended by Kodak for T-max films."
     
  5. Eric Rose

    Eric Rose Subscriber

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    Don Kirby uses XTOL exclusively. I've seen his prints first hand and they are stunning. Here is his website www.donkirbyphotography.com

    Check his stuff out. All shot on T-MAX100, 4x5.
     
  6. Jorge Oliveira

    Jorge Oliveira Member

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    My gripe with TMX is blown highlighs (street shots).
    The owner of the store where I buy my photo gear could not tame it, also.

    Any clues?

    Thanks,

    Jorge O
     
  7. bmac

    bmac Member

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    I agree with Jdef, it depends on your working conditions. I have pretty consistant working conditions, so once I did testing, I was able to control them. That is how I settled on 20% less than stated time (in a small tank, with 4 inversions every 30 seconds). TEST TEST TEST :smile:
     
  8. mobtown_4x5

    mobtown_4x5 Member

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    Jesus, I checked out that Don Kirby, he ROCKS- you say all those images were shot on T-Max? how come I can't do that with T-max?

    (I know this is not the answer to that question-but does anyone know any other technical details about how this guy works/materials?)

    Matt[/b]
     
  9. Eric Rose

    Eric Rose Subscriber

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    Hi there Matt,

    In talking with Don, he has done extensive testing with TMax and XTOL. I think he uses it 1:1 and if I dig thru my stuff I am sure I can find his developing times.

    Don is a very methodical practitioner. He is also a master printer. I suspect most of the magic begins there.

    I am taking a workshop from him in Oregon this Sept and am looking forward to it.
     
  10. Jim Moore

    Jim Moore Member

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    Thanks everyone for your replies.

    I got up today and thought to myself...

    "I would much rather go out photographing then testing film speed"...

    So I packed up my gear and went back Downtown with several rolls of 100-TMAX.

    I rated the film at 80 and used my cameras build in meter to determine exposure (something I rarely do, I usually use a Zone VI Modified Pentax Digital Spot Meter).

    When I got home I fired up the JOBO and developed 5 Rolls in Kodak XTOL for 7 1/2 minutes.

    I don't think that they turned out to bad. I will post some of the photographs in the gallery.

    Now all I have to do is work on my scanning. My prints look so much better than the scans.

    (Actual film testing to follow)

    Jim
     
  11. fschifano

    fschifano Member

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    D-76, 1+1 is very good for this film. XTOL at the same dilution is even better. I've used XTOL almost exclusively with this film and have always had good results.
     
  12. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Okay, you folks are driving me to try Xtol. What's another test, after all, and I've got about 75 sheets of TMX 8x10" around.
     
  13. JMcLaug351

    JMcLaug351 Member

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  14. kassel

    kassel Member

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    Hi everyone I'm new so I hope this works.
    I have found over recent times that Kodak has changed something on TMAX both 100 or 400. It looks grainy and dirty it's as though the fixer wont clear the film properly. I have done tests using FP4 and have eliminated chemicals being exhausted or contaminated. I was using Tmax developer and Ilfordtech. There did not seem a difference.
    Regards
    Rolf
     
  15. KenM

    KenM Member

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    Chip does some interesting stuff. He does a lot of long exposures, utilizing ND filters heavily. These long exposures lend a dreamy quality to his work. Very nic.

    The interesting thing about Chip is that he has his negatives scanned, and then performs most of his manipulations in Photoshop. He then makes his prints in a traditional wet darkroom with a digitally created negative, with further (minor) manipulations.

    I had the opportunity to meet him and see his show at the Whyte Museum in Banff Alberta last October - he's a very good printer, with a wonderful eye. Very strong compositions, and of mostly everyday scenes that I think most people, including myself, would pass by.

    For the equipment buffs in the crowd, he uses Hasselblad (501cm I think, and the 905SWC) cameras, and a Linhof Master Technica.