Developer for TXP320 in 4x5

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by drpsilver, Jan 18, 2007.

  1. drpsilver

    drpsilver Subscriber

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    17 Jan 2007

    I was sorry to see TX400 disappear in 4x5. In order to find a repacement I have tried some TXP320. I find that they are indeed VERY different films. I have two questions.

    1. I have developed TXP320 in D76(1:1) and Perceptol (1:1) with unsatisfactory results. I have rated the film at EI200 and EI160 respectively (from film testing experiments), and the overall density of the negatives looks good. The problem is that when I print them everyting looks flat by 1 to 1.5 paper grades. Can anyone suggest a developer that might give me a greater gamma without "blocking-up" the highlights?

    2. Should I abandon this film and look for another? If so, what would you suggest?

    Regards,
    Darwin
     
  2. David H. Bebbington

    David H. Bebbington Inactive

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    I really would simply try a longer dev time in D76 before I did anything else. Keeping all other parameters the same, I would try a 10% increase first and see how you like the results.

    Regards,

    David
     
  3. PHOTOTONE

    PHOTOTONE Member

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    I have always liked D-76 straight for TXP320. Used to keep a 3.5 gallon deep tank, and replenish as needed.
     
  4. Aurelien

    Aurelien Advertiser

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    I only use TXP320 in 120/220 format, but I always develop in Calbe A49 (or Ber49 it's the same) 1+1 10 minutes à 24°C. Wonderful!
     
  5. KenM

    KenM Member

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    HC110 works for me - I dilute 1:12, develop for 7 minutes (N). This is for sheet film, hangers and tanks.
     
  6. SuzanneR

    SuzanneR Moderator Staff Member

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    I love it in X-tol, semi-stand for portraits.
     
  7. JLP

    JLP Subscriber

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    As Suzanne i have used X-tol and also HC110. Best results with X-tol perhaps because i have used it more, still need to work with the HC110 to get it right.


    jan
     
  8. Tom Hoskinson

    Tom Hoskinson Member

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    With Tri-X 320 with a non-staining developer, I use either XTOL or Jordan's Instant Mytol (see the APUG Chemical Recipes).

    Tri-X 320 with a staining developer, I use Pyrocat-MC
     
  9. drpsilver

    drpsilver Subscriber

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    18 Jan 2007

    Thanks to all for the suggestions. Since I am most familiar with D76 I will start there and see if the tresults are satisfactory. If not, move on to the other possibilities.

    Regards,
    Darwin
     
  10. BradS

    BradS Subscriber

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    I always dev 320TXP in HC-110 dilution D. I think I use 6 minutes in the Jobo...
     
  11. rmartin

    rmartin Member

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    I have been using Clayt on F76+ (1:19) for 4x5 TXP320. When I did the film test described on the View Camera website, I get an EI of 400. This was my first film test so it is quite likely that I hosed it up. In any case I like the negatives I get.
     
  12. Rolleiflexible

    Rolleiflexible Restricted Access

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    Brad, really?! I process my TXP sheets in Jobo tanks and worried that HC110 might be too potent for the constant agitation. What speed are you shooting your film, with that recipe? I might have to try it.

    As for me, I process TXP sheets in Rodinal. I expose at EI 160 (and err on the side of overexposure when metering), presoak for a few minutes, and soup in a 1:50 Rodinal solution for 12-13 minutes at 68F. Works every time.

    Sanders
     
  13. JBrunner

    JBrunner Moderator Staff Member

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    I think sticking to D76 is your best option.

    If you are going to make a departure, then make it a big departure- you might try a Pyro developer. I have had very fine results with pyrocat and TXP320. I haven't tried any of the other pyro developers with it, but I would expect good results. Once you hit sheet film size the benefits of pyro become tangible, so its worth giving a try, if you feel you want to branch out, to see if it floats your boat.
     
  14. ChuckP

    ChuckP Subscriber

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    Is TX400 regular Tri-x? When was it available in sheet film? I have only heard of Tri-x 320 available in sheets. I use PMK or Pyrocat for 320TXP. My theory is that the highlight contrast problem on VC paper caused by the stain color is balanced out by the steep highlight curve of 320TXP.
     
  15. fatboy22

    fatboy22 Subscriber

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    Try Rodinal, 1:25 or 1:50

    I recently did some semi stand developement with this film, you get some really cool effects and plenty of contrast. Since its 4x5 the grain really does not look bad either.

    Jamie
     
  16. Cheryl Jacobs

    Cheryl Jacobs Member

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    I haven't delved too much into 4x5, but the attached shot was my typical Tri-X 320 in Tmax dev. It's all I use for medium format as well.
     

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  17. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member

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    There are many good developers for TXP.

    If you want to keep it simple, there's nothing wrong with D-76 or Xtol.

    I like ABC pyro (bigger negs) or PMK (smaller negs) usually.

    I don't know when Tri-X 400 last came in sheet sizes, but it was a long time ago. The current TXP sheet film replaces TXT sheet film, which was a 320 speed sheet film made alongside TXP (320) rollfilm, and TX (400) in 35mm and rollfilm sizes.
     
  18. Keith Tapscott.

    Keith Tapscott. Member

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    How exactly did you conduct your test? eg: exposure, processing technique/method(s) and how you arrived at your E.I. figures.
     
  19. BradS

    BradS Subscriber

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    Sanders,
    Yep....I didn't know any better when I first started with sheet film so...I gave it a shot. The Kodak data sheet for Tri-X (both flavors), does have a whole bunch of data for processing Tri-X in rotary tubes (see page 6 and page 15 of Kodak Tech pub F-4017).

    I use HC-110 dil D (1+39 from the north american concentrate) at 20 degrees C with continuous rotational agitation for something like 5 to 6 minutes.