Developing a found roll of Pan-X

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by EASmithV, Feb 5, 2013.

  1. EASmithV

    EASmithV Member

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    Hello All,

    I found an old roll of Panatomic X in a box of junk that I got.

    I heard HC-110 is good for reducing the fogging on old film, which is good because I have plenty.

    Any ideas for developing times? How much do you think I should give, in addition to the "correct" time to account for age?
     
  2. Born2Late

    Born2Late Subscriber

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    I developed an old roll of Pan-X (maybe 1982 vintage) about a week ago using Photographers Formulary Divided D76. Mine came out absolutely beautful.
    The Divided D76 really isn't very time sensitive. I believe I used 3 minutes in Part A and 4:30 in Part B.

    I've developed other old film (Plus-X and Tri-X) in HC110 and used the recommend time to push 1 stop with pretty good results.

    From what I've seen with my old film is the slower stuff ages better than fast film and doesn't need as much compensation.

    I have the original instruction sheet in the darkroom. If you would like, I can give you the box speed times for HC110..
     
  3. John Shriver

    John Shriver Member

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    Fog is not likely to be a problem with Panatomic-X. My vintage stock has no fog problems. It may be grainier than it was new. (No way to compare.)
     
  4. vpwphoto

    vpwphoto Member

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    HC110 dil B @68 or 70f for 7 min.
     
  5. EASmithV

    EASmithV Member

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    I guess I should mention that it is exposed, and I merely want to see what is on it.
     
  6. vpwphoto

    vpwphoto Member

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    That was how I took it.

    I occasionally have folks bring me film like that. From now on they pay first... I have negatives of who knows what that someone never came back for. They were about 20% base fog, so very very flat. This film was likely from the 1930's.