Developing Pan F Plus Together With Delta 100 in Same Tank

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by DF, Jan 28, 2013.

  1. DF

    DF Member

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    Pan F requires 8.5 minutes while Delta requires 12, according to the chart with D76 1:1. I've done Pan F with 10 minutes with good results, but If I bring it up to 12(to "please" the Delta), will it be damaged or just super high contrast? Is there an acceptable compromise between the two? Both rolls are of rainey night shots in the city - wet pavement reflecting lights/Christmas lights/cars zooming by/etc.
    Or, should one NEVER EVER attempt such a thing? I'm trying to kill two birds with one stone - since my time slot allows for just one roll/set to be developed.
     
  2. bdial

    bdial Subscriber

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    You probably don't want extended dev time for night shots, since the contrast will be plenty high already.

    If you have two tanks put one roll in each, start the Delta, 4 minutes later start the Pan F.

    Or, assuming you are working in a darkroom, and have only one tank, pre-fill your tank, load two reels with your film, making sure you keep track which is which. Put the Delta in the tank and start timing, after 4 minutes put the second roll in, put the cover on and turn on the lights.
     
  3. zsas

    zsas Member

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    PanF is contrast enough, but it depends on how the light was the day(s) it was shot. For eg, if it was sunny n bright, I'd not be too keen on pushing my PanF+....
     
  4. vpwphoto

    vpwphoto Member

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    I attempt it now and then, then regret the outcome. Do it right the way you know you should.
     
  5. DF

    DF Member

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    Sounds risky. There's only one tank with room for two reels. Are you sayong when 4 minutes are up, go in the darkroom, take the cover off, slip in the PanF? - What about the agitation?
    BOTH rolls are the city at night under wet rainey conditions, wet pavement reflecting lights, traffic in motion, etc.
     
  6. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    If I were you, I'd develop them separately. Bring two developing tanks. If you can't do that, start with the Pan-F since its latent image stability is not as good as Delta. But seriously, with such a wide variation in dev time needed, you are either severely compromising one of the films, or worse yet - both. You could ruin all of the hard work you put into the shooting.
    The lesson learned here is probably that it's better to shoot the same film on both occasions.

    Good luck!

     
  7. sewarion

    sewarion Member

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    well, the only reason for developing different films in the same tank is when i know that the same amount of time/temp/agitation works fine for both films. you might consider pulling the delta so 8.5 minutes would be an applicable dev time.

    you might have to run some tests in order to find out which e.i. is appropriate for developing delta for only 8.5 minutes. or run some tests in order to find out how you should expose, under which kind of lighting, pan f for developing it for 12 minutes. or you might look for two different films which require the same dev time (e.g., according to the mdc, hp5+ @400 and ilford pan 100 @400 iso both require 12 min in 20°C xtol 1+1).

    or you could simply develop films separately, respectively 2 of the same kind at a time.

    sewarion
     
  8. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    I always worry that the pssible additives in one film may adversely affect the others. The T-Max films contain a lot of iodide which is a powerful restrainer.
     
  9. TareqPhoto

    TareqPhoto Member

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    Well, i can understand sometimes why processing 2 films in one tank, but why not just go with processing each in different tanks and using the proper time? I don't know how much you save time or developer by doing this, if i process only 2 films and say using concentrate developer without dilution then i can reuse it for another film when i am done with one, i am not good in developing so i don't want to imagine going this route, but i may try doing this one day if i have 2 rolls exact the same instead of 2 different films.
     
  10. steven_e007

    steven_e007 Member

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    Second hand tanks are pretty cheap on eBay. Buy a second tanks and you can still develop them at the same time - but separately :wink:
     
  11. jim appleyard

    jim appleyard Member

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    if the shots are important, dev them separately or use a divided de like Thornton's.
     
  12. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

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    I develop pan F 120 film at 14 minutes in D76 at 1:1, 20c/68F with perfect results.
     
  13. DF

    DF Member

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    cliveh
    Basically what you're telling me, unlike everyone else here, is that it's O.K. to do what I'm considering...? Does 120 format require more development time than 35mm - 14 minutes?
     
  14. polyglot

    polyglot Member

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    Overdeveloping Pan-F is a Really Bad Idea because it rapidly becomes unprintable.

    The only way this is going to vaguely work for you is to use a 2-bath developer, e.g. Diafine. Those are mostly time- and temperature-independent because the total development activity is a function of how much of bath A is absorbed into the emulsion before being activated by bath B.

    Much simpler to just develop each film-type separately and correctly for the particular SBR that it was used with.
     
  15. DF

    DF Member

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    O.K. I'm chickening out. I'll develop them separately.
     
  16. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

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    Forget the charts and use what works best for you.
     
  17. vpwphoto

    vpwphoto Member

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    THE ONLY TIME it makes sense is if you are on deadline in the newsrooom... and still there was little harm in having two tanks going at once.
     
  18. vpwphoto

    vpwphoto Member

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    You asked for opinions/advise
    I gave you real world been there answers.... read mine again.

    Why do people come here looking for absolution or a sure thing answer.

    Yes it can be done, it may be fine. I will say again there are few situations where it is worth jeopardizing your efforts (making images on the street).

    I find that any economy in the darkroom (or with film photography) is a false economy in hindsight.

    Do as you wish, just don't go fishing for the answer you want.
     
  19. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    Good idea. If you over-develop the Pan-F roll, you will dearly regret it when you try to print the negatives (or scan them).