Developing time for Tri-X film

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by tossik, Jul 9, 2009.

  1. tossik

    tossik Member

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    Hi everyone, i got a question here about developing film here...

    I got a bulk roll of tri-x that I've shot a few rolls and I got a procedure list and chemicals to process it, but I would like to know how you guys do it and what chemicals you use.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Jim Chinn

    Jim Chinn Member

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    If its TriX 400 (arista premium 400) I use D76 1-1 for 10min @68F and Rodinal 1-100 for 22min @68F.

    Best thing is to pick one developer load some test rolls with 12 exposures and run some film tests.
     
  3. bdial

    bdial Subscriber

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    There are 34,000+ members here, questions like this seem good for at least 70,000 answers.

    The most common choices, in no particular order are
    Kodak D-76
    Kodak Xtol
    Kodak HC 110
    Ilford ID-11 (equivalent to D-76)
    Rodinal
    D-23
    various Pyro formulations
    and a zillion more, even including coffee

    All work well, and can produce excellent negatives, everyone ends up with one or two favorites. If what you have is fresh and you can easily obtain more as needed, there is no reason not to use it. Once you've worked with it enough to understand how it reacts to variations of exposure and processing time, branch out to others if you feel limited.
     
  4. wogster

    wogster Member

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    If you have no experience, the place to start is Kodak D76 or Ilford ID11 (these two developers are functionally identical) use the film at the speed on the box (box speed), and soup for the recommended time in the instructions that come with the developer or film. For Tri-X you can find the instructions online here.

    This is a starting point, once you do a couple of rolls, you will find that you may want to alter the exposure or development time, or both to get the result you want. Ask 10 photographers the best exposure and development time, you will get about 30 answers. This is mine.
     
  5. tossik

    tossik Member

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    Well I have a bag of d76. So I'm thinking of sticking with kodak. But what I'm
    asking mainly are the proportions and times and the procedure to develop it. I want to compare with what my notes say :smile:
     
  6. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    Kodak Xtol for years ........ See Kodak data sheet for temperature and tank type. Or use http://www.digitaltruth.com/devchart.php

    Planning on trying Pyro Roll

    Steve
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 10, 2009
  7. chgofrank

    chgofrank Member

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    I use HC110 developer with dilution B in a Nikor tank. 6.5 minutes at 68 degrees. I agitate for the first 10 seconds. and then once every 30 seconds for the rest of the time. I may vary it for different conditions such as low contrast or high contrast lighting conditions.

    I like HC110 because it keeps well and you can push process Tri-x with it when needed.
     
  8. Anscojohn

    Anscojohn Subscriber

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    *******
    Use the D76. 1:1. You can't go wrong. Use it and Tri-X for at least a year.
     
  9. tossik

    tossik Member

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    So totally a newb question, 1:1 is after I mix the bag with a gallon then I delute that again 1:1 when developing, right?

    and what about times for stop and fix?

    Thanks for all the replies! I really want to get back into film :smile:
     
  10. Jim Chinn

    Jim Chinn Member

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    if the TriX you are using is the 400asa version and you like it, you can buy it at a lower price at Freestyle Photo repackaged as Arista Premium 400 after your roll runs out.

    D-76 is a perfectly good developer and a good choice from which to make comparisons if you experiment with other developers in the future. If you did not buy the D-76 new but got it second hand chack the date on the package. I have always bought developers new but I imagine if it is out of date it may not work or work poorly compared to "fresh".
     
  11. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    tossik,

    Have you done any research on your own? Questions like what developer to use with what film is one that is ENTIRELY subjective. It's down to what people like for the most part. Here's a secret for you. You can use any developer you want. Really. It depends on what YOU like.
    But do start with D76, because it's the standard by which all other developers are measured. And there is a TON of information on how to use it out there. Especially Kodak's recommended developing times is a fabulous place to start.

    The answers to your questions about stop bath and fixing are mentioned on the manufacturer's packages and will vary with the product you use.

    I don't mean to sound negative, but how about you look some of the answers up? Use google and type into the search field: " Site:www.kodak.com fixer "
     
  12. Anscojohn

    Anscojohn Subscriber

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    Yes. Mix up the gallon of D76. Call that your stock solution. Just before developing, figure out how much solution you need to cover your film. Let's say you need sixteen ounces of solution to cover your film: take 8 ounces of stock solution and 8 ounces of plain water to make up you working solution. Try to have your working solution 68 F. Use your working solution once and throw it away.

    Stop bath--thirty seconds to a minute shall do just fine; use constant agitation.

    Fixer: with fresh fixer, pour it in and agitate gently for about a minute. Then you can take the lid off if you desire. Fix for 3-5 minutes, depending; agitate in the fixer every thirty seconds or so.

    Read the link to film developing provided above. Good luck, have fun; and keep asking questions. We're here to help.
     
  13. tossik

    tossik Member

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    anscojohn,

    thanks for that info, that was exacly the answer i was looking for.
     
  14. BetterSense

    BetterSense Member

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    I shoot lots of TriX at an exposure index of 200-320 depending on the light, and develop in D76 1+1 at 20C for about 8-9 minutes, depending on the light.
     
  15. pgomena

    pgomena Member

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    Tri-X in D-76, exposure index 250, 8 minutes in D-76 1:1 at 68 degrees F. Agitate continuously first 30 seconds, then two inversions of the tank each 30 seconds thereafter.

    Tri-X in HC-110 dilution B: EI 250, 5 minutes at 68 degrees F. Agitate continuously first 30 seconds, two GENTLE inversions each 30 seconds thereafter.

    Peter Gomena
     
  16. Henry Alive

    Henry Alive Subscriber

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    Last September, I wrote the results I had with TX400 / HC110. Here you can read it:
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/53976-tx400-hc110.html
    I just want to add that I repeated these analysis two months ago, and I got the same results. This time; I also read the relative density in Zone VIII, and it was 1.25.
    Theoretically, if you work with a condenser enlarger, like my case, a good exposed and developed film should has the following relative densities: ZI: 0.08 - 0.11 / ZV: 0.60 - 0.70 / ZVIII: 1.15 - 1.25.
    I think TX400, EI200, HC110, 1:47 (E), 6 minutes, 20ÂșC is OK.