Developing time preference

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Rick-in-LB, Jan 24, 2009.

  1. Rick-in-LB

    Rick-in-LB Member

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    Ok I admit I am new to this so not really sure of the answer. Is it or when is it better to develop slower rather than faster. If I use D76 stock the time would be faster/sooner than longer than if I was using a 1:1 dilurion. I use a generic D76 solution and just wondering. Yup I also understand that since I am doing film, whats the hurry, just relax.

    Thanks
    Rick
    Long Beach CA
     
  2. Saganich

    Saganich Subscriber

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    I suppose the question is what else besides time will be affected by diluting D76?
     
  3. jasonhall

    jasonhall Member

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    Me thinks Saganich has asked the real question here....
     
  4. jasonhall

    jasonhall Member

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    I think a few test rolls are in order, see the difference for your self.
     
  5. JBrunner

    JBrunner Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Faster development times give much less margin for error, and make minor adjustments nearly impossible.
     
  6. Rick-in-LB

    Rick-in-LB Member

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    Sooo Jason, if I use a diluted solution, does this mean that I do not have to be as exact on my process time. When I say exact I mean a 5 seconds either way. The charts and books say XX.X time and not a +-. I know it will all come in time. Heck the last time I spent this much time doing film was back in the early 70's.. if I remember correct!
     
  7. JBrunner

    JBrunner Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Well, look at it this way... with a development time of 4 minutes, 15 seconds is 6% of the time. You have begun to expand or contract the film, throw in a temperature error and you have lost control.

    15 seconds is about 2% of 10 minutes. You'd be hard pressed to find a difference even with a densitometer. Another 15 seconds or degree of temp and you are still within only minor density changes. I like big windows. Easier to crawl through.
     
  8. pgomena

    pgomena Member

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    Increasing the dilution of D-76 also decreases the concentration of sodium sulfite in the mix. Sodium sulfite is a silver solvent that eats away at the grain, giving the image a softer look. Diluting the stock solution will give you a sharper-looking image and a bit more apparent grain in addition to a longer developing time. Many people dilute D-76 1:1 as their standard working solution, some will dilute it up to 1:3. There are a lot of threads on D-76 dilutions and developer dilution in general if you search this forum.

    Peter Gomena
     
  9. edtbjon

    edtbjon Member

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    As Peter G. says, diluting the developer doesn't only affect the development time. There are other things happening too and some people have researched the phenomena quite a lot.
    Some word of advice. Summing up what J Brunner and others says, it's a good idea to dilute D-76 at 1:1 as it gives you more margin for timing error. Just don't forget that by diluting D76 it becomes a one-shot developer and you cannot save it and use it again.
    Also, stay with one developer and one dilution until you understand what is happening. The next thing to do isn't to test a lot of different material, but to learn how to adjust your way of working etc. to produce good prints. I.e. finding your own personal film developing times etc. There is a lot to learn, but also a lot of nice pictures along the way.

    //Björn
     
  10. Rick-in-LB

    Rick-in-LB Member

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    Thanks to all. I think I understand it a lot better now.

    Rick
     
  11. dancqu

    dancqu Member

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    Like to experiment? Take that D-76 to 1:7, 500ml per
    120 or equivalent. Agitate at start and each 2 minutes
    there after, 16 to 20 minutes. I've had good results
    from D-23 with same processing. Dan
     
  12. Rick-in-LB

    Rick-in-LB Member

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    Soooo at 1:7 how would I calculate the times? Lets say for tmax or delta 100 and 400. Heck it is worth a try.

    Rick
     
  13. dancqu

    dancqu Member

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    No problem. No calculating needed. Trial and Error,
    the only way to go. That's the way it is with a new
    developer or dilution. Even if time/temperature/
    agitation tables are used, a test or tests are
    needed to assure.

    As a starting point, I use 500ml of solution with Acros
    120, time and agitation per my previous post. Oh, 72
    to 75 degrees. As a clue to time, check the MDC to
    see how the films you intend to use compare with
    other films. Are yours to test quick or slow
    compared to the ones you know or are
    listed in the chart?

    A new one for the MDC. Perhaps I should contribute.
    I believe that is the way the chart has been built,
    by contribution. Dan