Development of 120 film-Chemicals

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Incroyable, Jan 20, 2005.

  1. Incroyable

    Incroyable Member

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    Hello,

    I am fairly new to developing 120 roll film in a hands on basis. However the darkroom at school that I use has the equipment, chemicals neccessary. I believe they use something from Lauder apparently. The film is Ilford Delta 100.

    My question is for the chemical process are the chemicals used for 135 film going to be the same as for the 120 development? I.e. fixer, hypo, etc. Also what about the timing? More or less or perhaps about the same.

    Thank you.
     
  2. VoidoidRamone

    VoidoidRamone Subscriber

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    yep, it's all the same. But you do want to put more liquid (keeping the same ratios) into the tank so that you get evenly developed negs.
    -Grant
     
  3. jim appleyard

    jim appleyard Member

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    Chemistry is the same, volume is different and times might be different. Many photographers add as much as 20% to the time.

    Try a test roll first!
     
  4. modafoto

    modafoto Subscriber

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    Why is the time different with the same film in different formats?
     
  5. rjr

    rjr Member

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    Morten,

    ´cause the emulsion isn´t the same and the film bases are different - varying in thickness, in coatings, in reaction to the developers.
     
  6. Ole

    Ole Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Because there is less need to worry about grain. TF (35mm) negatives are often made to print well on grade 3, MF for grade 1 1/2 to 2.
     
  7. modafoto

    modafoto Subscriber

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    Thanks for clearing this for me!
     
  8. rogueish

    rogueish Member

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  9. jim appleyard

    jim appleyard Member

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    The times are often, but not *ALWAYS* different. Plus the sprocket holes in 35mm may help to add small currents during agitation.
     
  10. andrewmoodie

    andrewmoodie Member

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    Thanks for that link, it's really good.

    I'd like to know if there are more people out there who expand their dev times when processing 120 film.
     
  11. Konical

    Konical Subscriber

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    Good Morning, Andrewmoodie,

    For T-Max 100 (favorite film) and T-Max 400, my processing times are generally the same for 35mm and 120/220. For the same films in 4 x 5, I'll generally reduce the time by 10% to 20% (for "normal" development) but only because I use a drum and the agitation is continuous. The other posting above are also correct to note that there can be slight changes in time with some films; checking the film data sheet is a good idea, at least as a starting point.

    Konical
     
  12. Tom Hoskinson

    Tom Hoskinson Member

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    I agree with Konical and would add that development times should be viewed as starting points. You should always expect to do some testing in order to tune the development process for your film, chemistry, equipment, end use (printing, projection, scanning, etc.) and personal preferences.