Diafine advice 400 vs 1250asa

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Harry Lime, Feb 25, 2012.

  1. Harry Lime

    Harry Lime Member

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    I have about 20 rolls of Tri-X, which I shot in very low light at 400asa, f1.4, 1/30th.

    My plan was to develop them in XTOL or DD-X @ 400, but I just mixed up a gallon of Diafine and have been toying with the idea of running the rolls in the later. But here is the crux.

    Normally I expose Tri-X at around 1000-1250 for Diafine, but these rolls were shot at 400.

    A few years ago i accidentally developed a roll of Tri-X that was shot at 400 in Diafine. The result was a very, very low contrast negative, with the shadows wide open. Not so good for shots taken on a sunny day, but not necessarily a bad thing for pictures taken in next to no light.

    Does anyone have any experience shooting Tri-X @ 400 at night and then developing in Diafine?


    Can anyone share their thoughts on this?



    Thanks

    HL
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 25, 2012
  2. pgomena

    pgomena Member

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    I'd go shoot a test roll under the same conditions and try it.

    Peter Gomena
     
  3. Harry Lime

    Harry Lime Member

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    Obviously.

    The last time I checked the purpose of a forum like this was to share experience and information.
     
  4. pgomena

    pgomena Member

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    Not trying to be a smart-xxx. When I've tried normally-exposed films in Diafine, I get flat images with full shadows. This quality most recently has been exploited for those who want to produce "optimal" negatives for scanning. Not knowing the brightness/contrast range of the situation you're shooting in, it's impossible to say what your results will look like. Hence my advice to test a roll.

    Peter Gomena