Did I buy the wrong fixer?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by RattyMouse, Dec 22, 2013.

  1. RattyMouse

    RattyMouse Subscriber

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    This weekend I finally bought chemicals to develop my own black and white film. I bought a package of D76 and a bottle of Kodak Fixer. However, looking at the B & H page for this fixer now shows that there are two bottles, not one. I only have one bottle.

    Do I not have enough fixer to run a black and white processing?

    This is very confusing. I dont have the bottle in front of me now as I'm at work. But my guess is that I have bottle A.

    Here is the B & H link.

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/27631-REG/Kodak_1464106_Rapid_Fixer_Solutions_A.html
     
  2. Truzi

    Truzi Subscriber

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    If you do have the A solution, you are probably ok. You probably don't need hardener for most modern films.

    I'm sure someone who knows better than I will be along shortly.
     
  3. RattyMouse

    RattyMouse Subscriber

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    Is two stage fixing common? It seems to add to the work load to process film. I dont recall ever reading about people doing 2 stage fixes.
     
  4. Tom1956

    Tom1956 Inactive

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    You bought Rapid Fixer. Kodak Fixer is a powder.
     
  5. Christopher Walrath

    Christopher Walrath Member

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    And according to the ad on B&H you are missing a bottle. I have had this happen before. Are you sure you did not get the second bottle as it is MUCH smaller than the first. Could be easy to overlook.
     
  6. RattyMouse

    RattyMouse Subscriber

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    Is this good or bad? I am very confused now.
     
  7. RattyMouse

    RattyMouse Subscriber

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    I bought a single bottle. I saw the word fixer and assumed that I was OK. No one speaks English in the store where I buy film so I am 100% on my own.

    I am seriously confused as to whether what I bought is worth anything to me now. The store is 8 miles or so from my house so it is not easy to get to during the week.
     
  8. eddie

    eddie Subscriber

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    You're fine, as long as it's Solution A. I use the same fixer, but never use the hardener (Part B).
     
  9. Tom1956

    Tom1956 Inactive

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    It's all preference. I always used plain Kodak Fixer and mixed up the powder into a gallon and was always sure that was all any fixer needed to be. The Rapid Fixer is a little bit more nasty stuff, but works quicker, if that's important to you. Rapid Fixer came in a tall suare box with a big bottle and a little one. The little one is the hardener. I always still use hardener (or Kodak Fixer, which has alum in it). All in your preference. The Rapid will do a better job on T-Max which is hard to clear in the first place.
     
  10. Roger Cole

    Roger Cole Member

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    Not necessarily. Kodak also makes Kodafix, which is an all liquid concentrate version of Kodak Fixer. It comes in a single bottle. I used to use it.

    If that's what you have, you're fine, but will have to fix longer. It isn't Rapid Fixer, it's identical, when diluted, to powder form Kodak fixer mixed for use. Well "identical" in use as far as I ever saw anyway. It's a hardening, non-rapid ordinary fixer.

    Dip a piece of film leader into the mixed fixer and time how long it takes to clear. Fix for at least twice that long, three times that long to be really conservative with modern films. It'll take longer than Rapid Fixer but work fine.

    EDIT: This is what I'm talking about and what I suspect he has. It used to come in rectangular bottles:

    http://www.freestylephoto.biz/1464080-Kodak-Kodafix-to-Make-1-Gallon
     
  11. Tom1956

    Tom1956 Inactive

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    I don't think they've made Kodafix in ages. Kodak Fixer is a powder.
     
  12. Roger Cole

    Roger Cole Member

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    I KNOW "Kodak Fixer" is a powder, but they certainly do make Kodafix; I linked above to Freestyle where you can buy it. Click the link and buy some if you like.
     
  13. Truzi

    Truzi Subscriber

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    I have some Kodak powdered fix mixed up. It is fine, but I think I'd really like rapid fix, especially for t-grain film. I do have some Ilford rapid fix, but I will use that for paper (don't want to use film in the same fix after paper).

    Not a question of good or bad - more one of what you want. I think the Kodak powdered fixer is an hardening fixer. It is also different chemically (so not "rapid"). I believe (but could be wrong) that the shelf-life of the powder (before you add water) is longer than that of unopened liquid rapid fix. A two-part fixer gives you the option of adding hardener, and rapid fix simply does the job quicker. I'm sure there is more.
     
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  15. eddie

    eddie Subscriber

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    Kodafix is still available.

    There are a few reasons I don't use the hardener:
    1- It's not necessary with most modern film emulsions.
    2- I like to use one fixer for both film and paper (although the dilutions are different). If you tone your prints, it's more difficult after a hardening fix.
     
  16. michael_r

    michael_r Subscriber

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    RattyMouse: see the fixer section of the second page in the following Kodak publication to help you clear things up

    http://www.kodak.com:80/global/en/professional/support/techPubs/e103cf/e103cf.pdf

    If you have a "part A" bottle called Rapid Fixer, you're fine. You don't need part B unless you want to turn the fixer into a hardening fixer. Hardening fixers are not really needed with current films and papers unless you are working with some specific materials/processes.

    If you have a bottle called Kodafix, you have a hardening rapid fixer. This is ok, but be sure to read the directions as films, and particularly papers can require longer washing times if they are fixed in a hardening fixer.
     
  17. RattyMouse

    RattyMouse Subscriber

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    This might be what I have. I really should not have posted until I got home to re-examine it. I was just alarmed to see a second bottle.

    On another note, prices here in China are brutal. I paid $20 for that bottle, not $8!
     
  18. RattyMouse

    RattyMouse Subscriber

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    Thanks everyone! I'll know tonight after work what I've got.
     
  19. Roger Cole

    Roger Cole Member

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    Kodakfix is a hardening NON rapid fixer. It works in practice exactly like Kodak Fixer you mix up from powder. I used a lot of it back in the old days.
     
  20. michael_r

    michael_r Subscriber

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    EDIT: thanks, Roger. Re-reading the MSDS, Kodak's literature on Kodafix (they currently call it Kodafix 200), and some processing instructions for TMax, I'm now confused. Well, hopefully ratty mouse has Kodak Rapid Fixer part A.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 22, 2013
  21. Tom1956

    Tom1956 Inactive

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    Well, one thing's for sure. The OP has some fixer of some kind, so that's the important thing.
     
  22. Roger Cole

    Roger Cole Member

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    Well no. It's quite possible that "Kodafix" changed from one to the other. But why on earth would they sell one that is nothing more than Rapid Fix mixed with part A and B combined?

    My apologies if it's Rapid Fix. Doesn't seem to make much marketing sense but, in any case, I suspect it is what he has, and it will work fine, just fix for 2-3x the time it takes to clear.
     
  23. RattyMouse

    RattyMouse Subscriber

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    I will be using an acid stop bath between developing and fixing.
     
  24. michael_r

    michael_r Subscriber

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    Roger, sorry about that - I edited my previous post. You might be right. I seem to have confused myself here. Hopefully I haven't confused anyone else too much.
     
  25. Roger Cole

    Roger Cole Member

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    No problem Michael.

    Well if it's RF Part A, well and good, but if it's Kodafix it does work fine, just takes longer. I used to use Rapid Fix for film back in the day and Kodafix for RC paper when I printed on a lot of RC, as it was cheaper and the instructions did specify half strength to mix it for paper (like Rapid Fix in that regard though - so thinking about it I'm less sure it's "just like Kodak Fixer mixed from powder" though the TIMES, when I pressed it into service on film because I ran out of RF, were the same as Kodak Fixer.)

    In any case Ratty, you're fine, just mix per instructions for film and fix for 2x-3x the time it takes to clear a piece of film leader. No worries.
     
  26. mfohl

    mfohl Subscriber

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    Kodafix

    I have used and continue to use Kodafix. Works for both film and paper, but with different dilutions. I just bought several bottles from my local camera store - Midwest Photo. They had to order it, but it is available.

    Works well ...

    Oops. I just read the intervening posts. It may take a little longer to fix, but that's OK with me.