Didn't check my iso settings and...

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by foxyscootie, Dec 14, 2005.

  1. foxyscootie

    foxyscootie Member

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    made a stupid mistake of shooting 2 rolls of iso 200 color film @ 3200. :sad: I could just cry.

    I was shooting my christmas tree last night(tri-x 400@3200) & forgot to reset the iso settings on my F4 before loading the color roll today. Yes I know this was a rookie mistake, but please go easy on the repremanding.

    Does anyone know what I should expect once they are processed? Will there be anything usable?

    Please tell me I'm not the only person who has ever done this! Just need a little encouragement today. :smile:
     
  2. Mike Kennedy

    Mike Kennedy Member

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    I,ve been down that road before and its not just a rookie mistake. I don,t know know if the film will be printable,thats really pushed to the max.
    My only suggestion, and I,m sure there will be more informed ones,is to drop the film at a good lab , tell them about the mistake and hope for the best.

    Mike
     
  3. foxyscootie

    foxyscootie Member

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    Thanks for the encouragement Mike.
    I guess dropping the film off at Walmart(or other cheap processor) for processing isnt a good idea...guess I'll be making a trip to the local pro lab. I'm sure they'll get a good laugh out of this. :smile:
     
  4. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Inactive

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    Thats a 4 stop push, there is only one lab in the country I know that might be able to make something printable out of your film and that is Rocky Mountain Labs in Colorado, there are not many labs that really even push color film anylonger, and I can guarantee you with normal processing, you will not get anything usuable on the film.

    Dave
     
  5. foxyscootie

    foxyscootie Member

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    Thanks Dave. I thought it was a total loss. I called the 2 labs here in my town & neither push c-41 color film. I'm going to trash them & learn from this mistake.
     
  6. foxyscootie

    foxyscootie Member

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    so true outofoptions, so true....
     
  7. rbarker

    rbarker Member

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    Spank, spank, spank. :wink:

    If the shots were of something relatively important, I'd try Dave's suggestion, and then insist that it was done intentionally for "artistic" reasons. :cool:

    If not, reshooting may be the less-expensive option.
     
  8. foxyscootie

    foxyscootie Member

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    ohhh watch it Ralph you may get something started....spankings can be fun :wink:

    As for the photos, this time I'm opting for the less expensive route & doing a reshoot.
     
  9. htmlguru4242

    htmlguru4242 Member

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    What i'd do (and have tried once before), is to develop the film in B&W developer, pushing them as you think is necessary (I have NO idea what the times would be; normally exposed color film for me developed in about 8:30 in D-76). This gets images, though they're not in color. Technically, after that, you could bleach and re-expose them, and then send them through recular C-41. This would result in color images with nasty color crossover, but it'd probably work. It's a stretch, but it'd be fun ...

    And we've all forgotten to change the ISO setting at one point or another. I usually shoot TriX, so this wouldn't be a problem, though i've done it with color ... shame it doesn't push well; the wide exposure latitude will do for one or even two stops either way, but four ...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 14, 2005
  10. cvik

    cvik Member

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    What is the name of the film? What type (E6, C41)?
    Some films push well, some don't.

    How was the light? (concert? indoor? outside at night? day?).

    If the images are important and it turns out too dark for printing you might try to scan the film as a last resort - specially if you used a slide film.
     
  11. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Inactive

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    Christian,

    She stated right in her first post, that it was ISO 200 Color Print Film, in other words C41...

    She would be very hard pressed to get anything out of these negatives at all.

    As far as cross over processing in B&W chemistry, your talking about a completely different type of film.. than that of traditional B&W..

    Dave
     
  12. foxyscootie

    foxyscootie Member

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    Thanks for the replies everyone. I am just counting this shoot as a loss, but fortunately I'm doing a reshoot today & I will be checking my settings before I push the shutter! :smile:
     
  13. htmlguru4242

    htmlguru4242 Member

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    Dave, is there a reson why you can't push-process C-41 film in B&W? I've tried it once and it worked, though the images had the typical orange mask ... Am I missing something here?
     
  14. Helen B

    Helen B Member

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    The yellow filter layer in colour neg films is often (almost always?) colloidal silver that is removed in the C-41 bleach. If you don't bleach, then the yellow filter must remain. and that, along with the yellow-coloured colour couplers that are there (in the orange mask), must raise the base density to blue light significantly. The silver isn't designed to form a usable image itself, so it can be a very low contrast image.

    Best,
    Helen
     
  15. cvik

    cvik Member

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    Nope, the first says "iso 200 color film". In fact, the first page doesn't say print film at all. However.. when i checked back I found a reply were it said that no lab does c-41 push processing in her area - I probably overlooked that one the first time.

    I didn't mention B&W film/chemistry at all.
     
  16. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Inactive

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    cvik,

    Normally when a situation of this occurs, as a person that worked in photolabs and the way the question was posed, I assume print film...

    As far as the B&W, I was addressing to another member who was talking about cross processing.

    Helen, posted a very good answer to the question posed.

    htmlguru4242,

    C41 film is an entirely different make up than traditional B&W, hence you should be able to achieve some possible artistic results, but not what would be considered ususable results in a normal sense...

    After working many years in pro labs, I guess I took the question for what it was, someone walks in the doors and says, "this is 200 speed film and I shot it at 3200, is there anyway to get something out of it?" and for 99% of the normal labs in the country, the answer is.....No! and apparently she was thinking along the same lines as I was and understood me with no problems.

    Happy Holidays

    Dave
     
  17. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    I would suggest you get Walmart or some similar inexpensive minilab to develop it for you. There probably won't be anything usable come from it, but at the very least you can refer to the negatives as an example of what that many stops of underexposure looks like.
     
  18. foxyscootie

    foxyscootie Member

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    Matt, thats what I was thinking too. It is a learning experience after all so I may as well have the negatives to view the outcome.
     
  19. Mick Fagan

    Mick Fagan Subscriber

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    If you get one roll developed in a normal C41 process and then wait until you find someone who does their own C41 processing and get them to push the film 2 stops. This should give you an idea of just what you really can do with C41 film. Time is on your side and if you know just what you can, or cannot get, this could be a good thing.

    I have over the years pushed C41 and have found reasonably useful negs by pushing one stop, which is an extra 15 seconds of developing. By going another 15 seconds I am able to push C41 two stops, (total extra time 30 seconds). I'm not saying the negs are great, but you do get a quite printable image.

    I have never been able to get a good printable picture by actually push processing past 2 stops, no matter how under exposed the negs have been.

    I was once successful with some 100 ASA film exposed at 1600 ASA by accident. I push processed 2 stops and got, just printable images, from a film that was underexposed 4 stops.

    Mick.