Differences between C330F and C330S?

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by TheFlyingCamera, Sep 19, 2007.

  1. TheFlyingCamera

    TheFlyingCamera Membership Council Council

    Messages:
    9,449
    Joined:
    May 24, 2005
    Location:
    Washington DC
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    What are the differences between these two animals? I'm looking at something to have in the studio for shooting color portraits, other than 35mm.
     
  2. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

    Messages:
    18,039
    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2004
    Location:
    West Midland
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I don't know but I had the much earlier C33 and that was a superb camera, and also a C3, I did look at the C330 spec, and the later 330s and 300f & it's something trivial, and irrelevant.

    Ian
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 19, 2007
  3. Dave Miller

    Dave Miller Member

    Messages:
    3,894
    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2003
    Location:
    Middle Engla
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
  4. Kobin

    Kobin Member

    Messages:
    236
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2005
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The F is an earlier model, has more metal (less plastic) than the S, and is somewhat heavier (more sturdy?) as a result. The F takes different focusing screens (IIRC), even those from earlier models which the S won't accommodate. Otherwise, service manuals are available for the F, but I've never seen one listed for the S. Never had an F, but love my S.

    I think a good C330 of whatever model will make an excellent studio camera, and they are relatively cheap.

    K.
     
  5. k_jupiter

    k_jupiter Member

    Messages:
    2,578
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2004
    Location:
    san jose, ca
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Scott,

    Why would you not be lookiing at a rb67 or something like that? I find the SLR a bit nicer to use than the TLR, I have both.Certainly the options to switch film backs proves to be a life saver at times.

    If you compare shutter systems, the rb series lens are amazing in their bulletproofness compared to the TLR Seikos.

    Just wondering.

    tim in san jose
     
  6. TheFlyingCamera

    TheFlyingCamera Membership Council Council

    Messages:
    9,449
    Joined:
    May 24, 2005
    Location:
    Washington DC
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I had the opportunity to play with an RZ the other day. I had some issues with configuration for the thing (rotating the back, mirror lock-up, etc) which were minor, but I don't like the square screen with crop marks for the 6x7 format. I've been a Hassy shooter for a long time, and I'm concerned that I'd have a bad habit of composing the whole way to the corners. Maybe I need to just rent one and play with it for a while. I can get an RZ with a 180 W-N lens and a back for around $500, or a C330 with a 135 or 180 for similar money. I'd be out to the tune of a grand or more to get back into a Hassy system.
     
  7. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

    Messages:
    20,584
    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2007
    Location:
    Southern California
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Scott,

    I had a C330 with the 65mm, 80mm and 250mm lens. The viewfinder was dark. It had a high fiddle factor. Some lenses cocked when the film was advanced, other lenses did not cock when the film was advanced.

    I abandoned it for my Hasselblad with 50mm, 80mm, 150mm and 250mm lenses and I am much happier ... I don't have that heavy bank book to carry around. :tongue:

    Others love the C330.

    Steve
     
  8. k_jupiter

    k_jupiter Member

    Messages:
    2,578
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2004
    Location:
    san jose, ca
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Yep. I know. But if you have any hankerin' for getting back into Hassey world, now is the time. I chose the rb, as for the same money as a 501, A12 and 80 mm Planar, I have a system with two bodies, all the lens from 50 to 180 ('ceptin the 140mm) 6 backs and four viewfinders. My photography and it's end product don't justify the difference between a 80mm Planar and a 90mm C lens.

    You can't go wrong with a C330, if you get a good one, I am still happy hauling my C220 around with a 65mm lens for doing 120 landscape shooting. I just don't like the paralax issues using it in studio and don't feel the 135 is the same quality of lens that the 127 is in rb land. The 65mm lens are good in both systems, the 80mm tlr seems as good as the 90mm but it has a slightly flakey shutter sometimes. The 180mm is sharper in the rb system, and then there is that pretty amazing 150 Soft Focus lens on the rb67.

    Best of luck,

    tim in san jose
     
  9. glbeas

    glbeas Member

    Messages:
    3,307
    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2002
    Location:
    Roswell, Ga.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I used to have a c330 system and shot quite a few good images with it. I found in the long run the camera was a bit delicate for the way I like to play. I also had to resort to glueing the sync switches to the X position to avoid accidents when changing lenses during a shoot. More than one session was ruined due to the switch being bumped off X inadvertantly. I moved to a Bronica system and my only regret is the easy close focusing ability afforded by the bellows and long rack of the TLR.
     
  10. Jersey Vic

    Jersey Vic Member

    Messages:
    3,924
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2004
    Location:
    Columbia Cou
    Shooter:
    Holga
    I like my c330f a great deal and my 80mm and 55mm are wonderful lenses.
    You may want to use a stepladder when shooting portraits or look for the fine eye level finder.
     
  11. markm

    markm Member

    Messages:
    6
    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Location:
    Louisville,
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    use a paramender

    re: k_juopiter's remark, for studio work you might want to try and dig up a paramender to solve the paralax issue.
     
  12. DBP

    DBP Member

    Messages:
    1,896
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2006
    Location:
    Alexandria,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I have an older C model and paramender if you want to try it. But I wouldn't expect parallax to be much of an issue at portrait distances. I think the lenses I have are the 80mm and the 180mm. I often prefer a TLR to an SLR for MF portraiture because the quiet shutter and absence of shutter lag for the mirror can cut down on blinking problems with nervous subjects.
     
  13. k_jupiter

    k_jupiter Member

    Messages:
    2,578
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2004
    Location:
    san jose, ca
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Actually with a C330 doing portrait work, you don't need a paramender. Good thing too, they are a PITB.

    I still think with the price of Hasseys and rb67s being what they are, they are the way to go.

    tim in san jose
     
  14. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

    Messages:
    20,584
    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2007
    Location:
    Southern California
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Thanks, due to APUG that is the way I went*.

    Steve

    *from a C330 to a Hassy.
     
  15. Ian Tindale

    Ian Tindale Member

    Messages:
    80
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2006
    Location:
    London
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I've got a C330 and a C330S. The differences are pretty minor in my opinion. I pick up one of them or the other fairly equally, the differences aren't really enough to affect the decision. Well, actually, the one significant difference between them that does affect which one I like to use is to do with the strap lugs. I prefer the way the C330 hangs - the C330S strap lugs are far too far forward, causing the camera to tilt up at an angle and dig into me by its rear hood edge as I walk along. Other than that, I like them both.
     
  16. jovo

    jovo Membership Council Council

    Messages:
    4,124
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2004
    Location:
    Jacksonville
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    If you go with the TLR, get the prism finder as well. It makes a world of difference, and is quite bright enough for any normal application. All my currently posted 'graphs were made with my C220 and the prism (NOT the Porrofinder). I've had mine for over 20 years and love it's lightness and ease of use. If I didn't have it, however, I'd very seriously consider the Hassie. It's also light and has become really affordable now.
     
  17. k_jupiter

    k_jupiter Member

    Messages:
    2,578
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2004
    Location:
    san jose, ca
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    OK, for the purpose of disclaimer...

    I have had my C220 for 14 years now. It takes great photos. But I have never really felt comfortable with it and I have never been able to articulate why. The first time I picked up my rb67... something clicked. I had my finger on the shutter release.


    No, I think it's a matter of taste. I had already used a rb graplex and thought it was a great camera. It was an easy transistion to a smaller mamiya rb.

    I am sure Scott will make the correct decision.

    tim in san jose
     
  18. 3Dfan

    3Dfan Member

    Messages:
    218
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2006
    Shooter:
    35mm RF
    What's the difference between the prism and porro finders?
     
  19. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

    Messages:
    16,824
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2005
    Location:
    Delta, BC, Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The porro finders are essentially a mirror. They are lighter than the prism finders, but a lot less bright.

    Matt
     
  20. TheFlyingCamera

    TheFlyingCamera Membership Council Council

    Messages:
    9,449
    Joined:
    May 24, 2005
    Location:
    Washington DC
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    just so y'all know, I've not gotten a TLR at this point - I have a 3x4 RB Graflex model D, with a 6x9 rollfilm back. I'm still kicking around the idea of getting a C330 for studio portraiture, just for the ease of use with strobe, if nothing else. Although, I DID see a Hassy 500 EL/M (I think it was an EL/M... might have been just an EL) in my local camera store for $85. I need to call and ask what the heck that's all about.
     
  21. mgb74

    mgb74 Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,961
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2005
    Location:
    Minneapolis,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    One significant difference (applies to any TLR vs any SLR) is that you see the subject at the moment of exposure.

    As to "a C330 with a 135 or 180 for similar money" (in this case $500), I think you can do a lot better than that if buying from a private party and minimally patient. I'd stay away from the older chrome (Seikosha shutter) lenses.
     
  22. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

    Messages:
    20,584
    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2007
    Location:
    Southern California
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I got rid of my C330 because of the fiddle factor - there was no "ease of use" with a C330. However there is ease of use with a Hassey.

    Just my thoughts.

    Steve
     
  23. Philippe Grunchec

    Philippe Grunchec Member

    Messages:
    292
    Joined:
    May 24, 2008
    Location:
    Paris (Franc
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    For my (future) C330, I wonder if I should buy a 135 or a 180. Is there a quality difference?
     
  24. benjiboy

    benjiboy Subscriber

    Messages:
    8,540
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2005
    Location:
    U.K.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Mamiya C lenses

    I have both the 135 and 180 super, I have used them for twenty three years, they are both very good, I prefer the135 especially if I'm working in my small studio, or in peoples houses, the 180 is good for tight head shots, and outdoors.
    Quality wise, overall probably the180 is better, but they are both capable of excellent results.