Discontinued E-6 Chemistry Question

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by Ira Rush, Nov 17, 2009.

  1. Ira Rush

    Ira Rush Member

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    While this topic (Kodak Chemistry Discontinuation Notice) has created many posts and legitimate concerns in the B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry subforum on this board, I am wondering about the E-6 chemistry that was also mentioned. (see DISCONTINUED KODAK (Chemistry products) in the B&W subforum)

    Now I certainly don’t want to create any more panic, or Kodak bashing, but my question is this…

    Since I do not do any home E-6 processing, but rather send my transparency films out, do any of the items listed in this discontinuation notice have an impact on commercial E-6 labs?

    For those who do process E-6 at home, are you concerned?

    We have seen Kodak drop many of its E-6 films, and now this...

    Is this the “beginning of the end” for commercial E-6, just as Kodachrome K-14 processing is on its final way out?

    Again, my intent is not to create more Kodak bashing, I do not want to create any more “Doom and Gloom”, I’m just wondering?

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. AgX

    AgX Member

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    There are other manufacturers. I can't see any “beginning of the end” at those at all by means of discontinuancy.

    However, Fuji-Hunt offers special low-throughput chemistries for C-41. This of course reflects changes at the labs.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 17, 2009
  3. nickrapak

    nickrapak Member

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    If you notice, all of the discontinued E-6 products have an equivalent in a smaller size that is not discontinued. If anything, I see the discontinuation of larger sizes of chemistry a reaction to the lower throughput of most E-6 labs.
     
  4. Tom Kershaw

    Tom Kershaw Subscriber

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    Larger than the 5 litre kits I presume? The last time I tried to look for Fujihunt product information not very much was forthcoming.

    Tom
     
  5. PHOTOTONE

    PHOTOTONE Member

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    Kodak discontinued the "to make" 5 gal sizes in some components. Now you have to buy the "to make" 10L SIZES. This is inconvenient for me, as my sink-line is 3.5 gallons...but I will survive.

    I "think" the 10L sizes correspond to the tank size in the most popular automatic E-6 processors.
     
  6. Tom Kershaw

    Tom Kershaw Subscriber

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    So you're currently running a manual 7 bath E6 process line?

    Tom
     
  7. PHOTOTONE

    PHOTOTONE Member

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    Yes I am, to serve the processing requirements of my own photo studio work. 4x5 color transparencies of products. It is dip-n-dunk, in tanks in a water-bath sink.
     
  8. DanielStone

    DanielStone Member

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    phototone,

    could you post a pic so we could see :smile:? pretty please?

    good to see some people still using 4x5 chrome for product and advertising. why not negs just out of curiosity?

    -Dan
     
  9. PHOTOTONE

    PHOTOTONE Member

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    The reason for using chrome (reversal) color films is the same reason as it has always been. You get a finished product (as far as the photographer is concerned) when you process and dry the film, and the client can view it without any further work. 4x5 is just big enough for the client to evaluate, and 4x5's are easy to scan, even on inexpensive flatbed scanners. Plus the client has the "potential" to have wall size posters and signs made from the image if they wish (due to the amount of detail captured, and absence of grain), so one image can serve for both catalog photos, and blown up for trade show displays.

    The narrower contrast range of reversal film is of no concern with studio lighting, as you just adjust your lighting ratios to fit within the abilitiy of the film to capture detail.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 17, 2009
  10. DanielStone

    DanielStone Member

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    oh ok...

    got it.

    possible to still post a pic of your sink-line? if not, its ok. just interested to see how you do it.

    thanks

    Dan
     
  11. PHOTOTONE

    PHOTOTONE Member

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    Yes, but not tonight. Maybe shoot one tomorrow.
     
  12. brucemuir

    brucemuir Member

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    I would love to fantasize as well :D

    No rush I understand you must be busy.
     
  13. rjphil

    rjphil Member

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    Glad to see that someone else is a sink line person. I've had mine since 1982,
    and have become one of the last E6 lines around my area. Keep up the good fight Phototone!
     
  14. PHOTOTONE

    PHOTOTONE Member

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    My "sink line" is actually an old Kreonite sink designed for an early print process, and it has been repurposed for my E-6 and C-41 processing. I am using the original stainless steel tanks for E-6 and some Cesco-lite tanks for C-41, although I haven't processed C-41 in a few years.

    It is all manual, with a home made set up for intermittant nitrogen burst and compressed air agitation (depending on chemical). The sink line goes back to the 1950's, but my use of it has been since about 1978.