DK-50 and it's use

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by $modelman$, Dec 13, 2004.

  1. $modelman$

    $modelman$ Member

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    I have been given about a dozen hermetically sealed packets of DK-50 powder. Has anyone used this for Tmax100. I've been using hc110, but with all this developer, I would hate to chuck it. Still soft in the packs. Any ideas??
    Bart
     
  2. Tom Hoskinson

    Tom Hoskinson Member

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    Kodak DK-50 is a general purpose MQ film developer. I just posted the formulation in the APUG Chemistry Recipes.

    Mix some up and try it. I would try it both undiluted and diluted 1:1 and compare the results to HC110.

    You could also try adding a smidgen (.1 to .2 grams/liter) of Ascorbic acid.
     
  3. $modelman$

    $modelman$ Member

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    What kind of times at 68 degreas?
    bart
     
  4. Lee Shively

    Lee Shively Member

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    The newspaper where I once worked used DK-50. It was affectionately called "DK-grain" by the other photographers. Fresh and full strength it was about 2 1/2 minutes for Tri-X shot normally. When processing time extended to 5 minutes, it was tossed out. Thirty-five mm negatives were nasty--big mushy grain balls and lots of contrast. The only reason it was used at the paper was because it was fast and fast was more important than good (which is why newspapers use digital today). Later everyone switched to FG7.
     
  5. bobfowler

    bobfowler Subscriber

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    Here's a starting point

    I tried it years ago with Tmax 100. I wasn't crazy about the results, but I'm not crazy about Tmax anyway. I got my best results diluted 1:1 for 6 minutes @68F (that was 35mm film in a small tank, 3 inversions per minute).
     
  6. $modelman$

    $modelman$ Member

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    Thanks, I'll try that
    Bart
     
  7. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    i used to process boxes and boxes of 5x7 sheet film deep tank in hangers in undiluted dk50. the 4x5 was my film, the 5x7 was for a portrait photographer. i would normally enlarge her split and full 5x7 negatives, sometimes to 16x20 or 20x24, we never had any problem with grain. ( she shot all tri-x and tri-x ortho ). we used dk 50r ( replenisher ) and never had straight/new/fresh developer --- we "mellowed" the fresh tank with about 1/3 the spent developer - maybe that is why we never had harsh contrast or grain issues. it was about 16 years ago, but from what i remember i usually processed @ 68ยบ for about 6-7 minutes ...

    john
     
  8. Tom Hoskinson

    Tom Hoskinson Member

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    I posted ballpark development times (5 to 10 minutes at 68F) and suggested dilutions (straight and 1:1) with the formula. You would need to determine the actuals by testing.

    Diluted - maybe with a smidgen of ascorbic acid added, it might work pretty well with films like TMax 100.

    A "smidgen" of ascorbic acid would be something like 0.1 to 0.2 grams per liter.

    I get my ascorbic acid (food grade) at Trader Joe's Market.
     
  9. glbeas

    glbeas Member

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    Would the stuff do for print developer? I have a couple of cans sitting around but have no desire to submit my film to its abuse.:confused:
     
  10. Charles Webb

    Charles Webb Member

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    Methinks someone is a bit confused about DK 50. We used it for years at the Denver Post for use with 4x5 on fast breaking news and it was/is excellent.

    DK 50 was never intended to be used with 35mm, or medium format for that matter. Sheet film was it's forte. For quick 35mm development that gave grain as described by some one else was developed in straight Dektol. I have used Dk50 for more years than I can count, it is vertually grainless with TriX, Plue X, most of the old Geavert films and last but not least works very well with T Max.

    Sorry, but DK 50 is a darn good developer, if the gentleman that has about a dozen packages (one gallon I suppose) wants to cut me a deal on about six gallons, I'll buy it from him.

    Respectfully,
    Charles Webb
     
  11. Charles Webb

    Charles Webb Member

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    Whoops, forgot something! Dk50 is not a paper developer but I will admit I never had a reason to try it on paper, perhaps it might!

    C Webb
     
  12. Tom Hoskinson

    Tom Hoskinson Member

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    It will develop paper - but you would need to test it to see if you like the results. :wink:

    If you add about 9 to 10 grams/liter of Hydroquinone and 1.5 grams/liter of Potassium Bromide to the DK-50 stock solution, you will get a developer similar to Kodak D-72 (which is similar to Dektol).
     
  13. $modelman$

    $modelman$ Member

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    charles, check your messages
    Bart
     
  14. fparnold

    fparnold Member

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    Years ago, (because we had pounds of it generously donated), i used DK-50 1:1 on HP5. It gave nice contrast, and good mid-tone separation, as well as good acutance. Yes, in 35mm it does show some grain, but it was a pleasing grain. I made a lot of informal portraits in overcast or indoor conditions with it.

    Somehow I can still remember one full-length portrait where you can make out (barely) the lettering on the snaps of his Levis. If you have the right conditions, it's probably worth using.