Do Fujiroids/Polaroids Develop to Completion?

Discussion in 'Alternative Processes' started by FilmIs4Ever, Mar 25, 2009.

  1. FilmIs4Ever

    FilmIs4Ever Member

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    I've always worried about over-developing. Yesterday, though, I shot quite a few outside, not knowing the temperature, and definitely under-developed.

    The instructions provided by both companies, frankly, just suck.

    If anyone could shed more light on the way these materials behave as opposed to, say, slide film, I'd be most grateful.
     
  2. Alex Hawley

    Alex Hawley Member

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    I haven't really experimented enough to verify to myself that the following is true so I am relying on what Ansel Adams and Polaroid have written in years past to be true. In general, overdeveloping does not occur or, if it does, it is a slight amount. This is because the chemical reactions taking place are structured so that they play out after a little over a minute or so.

    In my own verification, I always develop Type 55 negatives for a full minute, contrary to the instructions. Nothing really changes going even a bit longer.

    I have intentionally tried this with Fuji and your mileage may vary. But I kind of doubt any real harm will come from overdeveloping.
     
  3. tiberiustibz

    tiberiustibz Member

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    The color does not develop to completion. It alters the color balance to under or over develop. The B+W stuff does AFAIK because you can leave it for up to 15 minutes according to the fuji instructions.
     
  4. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    All peel apart instant products stop developing when you peel them apart. They have an acid layer and a timing layer to reduce alkalinity.

    All integral instant products have a timing layer that kicks in roughly 2 - 5 minutes after the pod bursts and this brings the pH down which shuts off development.

    All instant products, just like all normal photo products are temperature sensitive and the results vary with temperature.

    So, the answer is "NO" they do not develop to completion, but they can suffer from temperature effects which can over or under-develop them.

    PE
     
  5. PHOTOTONE

    PHOTOTONE Member

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    If you are outside in sub-70f temperatures, just put the developing picture under your jacket in your armpit. This is an ideal environment for adequate development. Just to clarify, outside your shirt but inside your sweater or jacket in your armpit.
     
  6. FilmIs4Ever

    FilmIs4Ever Member

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    So, can you push and pull?

    How can you bring the temperature up by putting it in your coat when it's still cold from the outside environment?

    I've done this in extreme cold situations. It still didn't warm up enough to develop in 5 minutes.

    How does the color shift with color if you go over or under?


    Seems there is just as much confusion out there too.

    What if I am under 50F (~10C) and the time would have to go even longer than 4 1/2 minutes. Is the damn thing just not going to develop?
     
  7. Alex Hawley

    Alex Hawley Member

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    No, you can just underdevelop or overdevelop just slightly. All the chemistry is geared to making a nominal print.

    It depends totally on what temperature the film itself is at. If you have had you camera and film exposed to cold temperature for a long enough time, its going to take a while to warm up. If it freezes, you make likely burst the chemical pod. Instant film should never be frozen.

    Dunno. Someone else will have to answer that.

    Its best not to try that. Instead, try keeping the film warm until you fully ready to expose the shot. Then do something to keep it warm while it develops.