Do you pre-wash/pre-soak Fuji Acros ?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by david b, Mar 12, 2008.

  1. david b

    david b Member

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    I was just looking at the pdf for the film and it does not mention it to do it or not.

    Developing steps for the film start with the developer.

    I normally do it with my Ilford films (which say not to).

    So, do you pre-soak or not?
     
  2. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    No film manufacturer recommends pre-soaking B&W film, there's a similar thread here 2 or 3 days ago. No I never pre-soak, it's totally unnecessary.

    Ian
     
  3. jmcd

    jmcd Member

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    I do find pre-soaking helpful with sheet film, not necessary for roll film.
     
  4. trotkiller

    trotkiller Subscriber

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    I use acros 100 roll film and I always pre-soak but I always pre-soak all my films, its just the way I was taught.

    I'm sure if I didn't pre-soak it would make absolutely no difference, but as I said I have always done it that way. You you know what they say about old dogs and new tricks :D
     
  5. Dave Swinnard

    Dave Swinnard Subscriber

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    With my Acros (roll), I presoak now that I'm using mostly Pyrocat-HD but did not when I used Xtol (1+3) or Perceptol/Microdol (1+3).

    I started presoaking films back in the early 80s when I started processing roll films in the Unicolor film drum on a motor base. Using water with a bit of Edwal LFN in it prevented streaking and mottling issues I was having. Now I'm back to the manual tank for smaller formats and presoak only with Pyrocat as per Sandy King's recommendations.

    Dave
     
  6. dpurdy

    dpurdy Member

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    I always presoak Acros and I use a lot of it. I have presoaked everything for 20 some years when I came to realize it helped with processing eveness. I used to presoak only 30 seconds until Kodak came out with the Tmax films and recommended a 2 minute presoak. Now I presoak everything for 2 minutes. The only problem I might have ever had with a presoak was with Agfa films but I am not certain of that.
     
  7. david b

    david b Member

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    well I did a 1 minute presoak, agitating the entire minute, and I got what I think are uneven developing marks.

    I've used a ton of APX 100 and FP4+ and have always done the presoak with a problem.

    So I guess I will try acros without the soak.
     
  8. colrehogan

    colrehogan Member

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    I presoak my Acros sheet films (and all other brands of sheet films) for five minutes prior to development with Pyrocat-HD.
     
  9. david b

    david b Member

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    I should mention that all three films are done in xtol.

    I should also mention that I have never had this with Ilford or Agfa roll film before.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 12, 2008
  10. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    I went back to a Kodak "how to" book from the 40s, and in it they show roll film being pre-rinsed! This was when film was a lot softer than today, and so they also show a rinse after development, instead of the stop. This was the time of Eaton's book in which he suggested a rinse for film, but later changed it to a stop.

    PE
     
  11. Baxter Bradford

    Baxter Bradford Member

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    There is an awful lot of dye which comes out in the pre-soak. I have no evidence, but it just seems best to get rid of this before putting the Dev in, especially if using a staining dev such as Pyrocat. Having different substances all dissolved in a small amount of liquid seems like asking for problems.

    I'm now using a Jobo ATL, so accept that it is no extra effort for the pre-rinse and volume of dev is lower. Six sheets of 5x4 use 300ml vs 1000ml in my previous device, a Combi-plan tank (though I still pre-soaked using that too).
     
  12. david b

    david b Member

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    I shot another roll today in the Fuji GA645w that I just got.

    I developed the roll of Acros without a pre-soak and it looks
    perfect.

    I will shoot a few more tomorrow just to make sure.
     
  13. lns

    lns Member

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    Funny, I always presoak. With Fuji Acros, there is a LOT of blue dye that comes out in the presoak. More than with most films. Also some red tint in the fixer. I just developed two rolls of 120 tonight, by coincidence. -Laura
     
  14. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    Pre-soaks are also very handy if, like me, you shoot more than one format and use more than one style of tank, and sometimes forget to check the capacity of a tank before loading film in it.

    (Hint: pre-soak with the tank full, then empty the tank and measure how much water was in it).:surprised:

    Matt