Does anyone here do people photography with slide film?

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by EricO, Jul 20, 2011.

  1. EricO

    EricO Member

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    Just curious because I do mostly people photography and rarely shoot with slide film. I would like to shoot with MF slide (or 35 mm) but I never get a chance to use it.
     
  2. Tim Gray

    Tim Gray Member

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    I have. Not a lot but a bit. Just got a shot developed of someone on E100VS. A friend shoots predominately people on predominately Velvia 50...
     
  3. EricO

    EricO Member

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    When you saw the shot did you wish you'd chosen print film?
     
  4. mbsmith

    mbsmith Member

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    I have shot people portraits using most of the currently produced e6 films in 120 (some against my better judgment:D). My favorite is definitely Astia 100F.
     
  5. narsuitus

    narsuitus Member

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    Yes, the slide films that I prefer for shooting people are:

    Fuji Astra
    Fuji Provia
    Kodak E100SW

    My most recent purchase was a year ago. Therefore, I do not know if they are still produced or available.
     
  6. BrianL

    BrianL Member

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    Shot a lot of slide film, primarily Kodachrome until the rolls ran out last year. Also, TechPan developed as a transparancy some years ago. All in MF. Nothing like it in my books for color shoots. Makes prints look so bland. Only advantage of shooting 35mm over mf is that not all processing labs will mount mf in holders but return it uncut. Other advantage is finding an old projector is easier for 35mm than mf. Advantage is that the times enlargement is less for the same size projection resulting in holding color, contrast and detail better provided the projector lenses are equal quality and the bulb outputs are comparable at a given distance. B&w projected can really be beautiful.
     
  7. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Threads merged. Most people see new threads in the "new posts" view, so there is no need to create duplicate threads in more than one subforum.
     
  8. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    And in answer to the question, yes--Astia 100F usually, when I do.
     
  9. BradS

    BradS Subscriber

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    Not so much anymore but I used to do a lot. My favorite slide film is Kodak E-100G (for everything - not just people).
     
  10. CGW

    CGW Member

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    Shot loads of Agfa Scala in both 35mm and 120--a film I desperately miss. 6x6 and 67 slides are jaw-dropping on Kindermann and Mamiya Cabin projectors--Scala portraits particularly. Still slowing shooting thru my pile of 120 E100GX. The only constraint I'm feeling now is the thinning of tight E6 lines in my area.
     
  11. Lionel1972

    Lionel1972 Member

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    I do on 135, 120 and 4x5. I like Provia, Astria and E100G. Not certain yet which emultion I prefer. Astia can be a bit too plain to my taste. I wish we could have Kodachrome back in 120 and sheet film. I love slides, both on the light table with a good loupe or projected (35mm and 6x6). The "being there" feeling is unbeatable.
     
  12. anon12345

    anon12345 Member

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    Memories are made of this . . .

    Everyone finding a comfortable position in the living-room. You can feel the excitement in the air.
    Grandpa (me) extending the silver screen into position, and forgetting how it snaps into place, followed by Grandpa speaking in a foreign language.
    The sound of a high speed fan.
    The distinct smell of overheated wiring and burnt electrical windings circulating throughout the room.
    The sound of gears and levers shuffling another slide behind the lens.
    The silhouette of a small human on the screen, followed by . . . That's me! That's me! That's me!
    Grandma laughing, and Grandpa saying . . . "How the hell did that slide get in there!"
    The blinding light that comes after the last slide in this carousel has been shown.
    The occasional loud "POP!" and everything goes dark, followed by Grandpa using words in a foreign language, again.

    :smile: I do love slides.

    I have exposed about ten rolls of ELITE Chrome 100 this year. It only costs about $5 per roll to have them developed and mounted here locally. For family snap-shots and the memories that accompany them, it's worth every penny.

    Dann
     
  13. holmburgers

    holmburgers Member

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    Great story Dann !

    My aunt showed me pictures from her 1972 study abroad trip to Europe, and fortunately she shot the majority on Kodachrome. There's nothing like seeing people in your family when they were your current age, and wondering where you'll be when you're they're age.

    All told, it is the greatest way to view pictures from a roll of film. It becomes a "show", and where else are you going to see your own pictures that big, and in such vibrant beautiful colors?
     
  14. jeffreyg

    jeffreyg Subscriber

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    I rarely shoot color now but years ago I did use transparency film for some people pictures. It should be no different than using other film. It would have less exposure latitude than print film. As with other color films the color temperature of the light could have a noticeable effect. Dare I say here it probably would be easier than color negative film color-wise to scan if you were so inclined.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/
     
  15. F/1.4

    F/1.4 Member

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    I cracked off a few pictures of my neighbors about 30 minutes ago on some E100VS. I just dropped it off to get developed and will see hopefully later today or tomorrow what happens.
     
  16. Lamar

    Lamar Member

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  17. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    I shoot transparencies when I want to push and pull color film, for the most part.

    For portraits, I don't really shoot transparencies, since when I shoot people on film, I generally intend to make type C prints. Usually if I do shoot portraits on transparency film, it is because the transparency is somehow part of the intended presentation (backlit). That usually means at least 6x7 format, but more likely sheet film. I've done portrait "sculptures" on more than one occasion, but it is not common. it is almost always negative film.

    Fashion and other products, OTOH, are great with transparency film IMO, because it lets you view and select the images directly, with the characteristics of the film you chose clearly visible. Since I don't often intend to make type C prints from fashion or prouct pix, but will have them scanned in the end, this is a preferable "workflow" to me. Transparencies give you a pretty good idea of what the final product will look like without having to print or scan first. In the cases I do shoot film instead of digital for this subject matter, it is to obtain higher quality than small format digital can offer. That is not needed all that often.

    Now, if I shot fashion and still lifes for my own "artistic" uses, I'd probably want the final product to be type C prints, so I'd shoot negative film. But I do not often shoot these things for my own purposes. Shooting them for other people, if it is film at all, it is usually transparencies.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 22, 2011
  18. F/1.4

    F/1.4 Member

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    So I just got back and looked over my film, the E100G is definaylu less contrasty, and has more realistic color. The E100VS looks very vibrant and the couple portraits I did with it look amazing on a light table! They had very even light since they were in open shade, and the high contrast just worked perfect for the flat lighting. I'll post them up on here when I get them scanned for sure! What really surprised me was despite them being in the shade, the color isn't very blue. LOVE IT.
     
  19. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    The color may not look that blue, but I can pretty much guarantee you that would like them even more if they had been filtered (assuming neutrality is your goal). At the very least, I'd recommend one of the 81 series filters when shooting in light open shade. In deep shade, I would go for the full-on 85 filter, and also keep an 82 series filter in your bag to cool that off a bit if desired.
     
  20. Roger Cole

    Roger Cole Member

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    I'll echo those who like E100G. It's become my favorite color film for any time 100 is fast enough. Lovely stuff, including for portraits, lovely enough that it sorely tempts me to order up some Ilfochrome again, high price or not.
     
  21. Hops

    Hops Member

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    Tim, does your friend do something to compensate for ruddy skin tones with Velvia 50? I've never shot Velvia 50, so am assuming it does similar things to skin that the Velvia 100 (non-F) does. Is that correct?


     
  22. bwcolor

    bwcolor Member

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    Against my better judgement, I shot some Velvia 50 portraiture in low contrast lighting and to my amazement I came up with one of my favorite photos hanging on my wall. Usually use C-41, or if E-6 .. Astia.
     
  23. Rolleijoe

    Rolleijoe Member

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    I recently shot a couple of 645 rolls of E100VS of my parents' for their 65th anniversary, at the same location as their 1st date, all those years ago. The lighting was perfect, and with Apertire & iPhoto, all was under control. no problem. Picked 3 for 8x10s. Back on Maui I used to charge a pretty penny for this same thing. During the actual funeral, I shot Rollei Pan Ortho 25. Should look spectacular.
     
  24. AlbertZeroK

    AlbertZeroK Member

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    Goth in Velvia. I LOVED IT!

    And yesh, show a model 6x7 Chrome from a shoot - TALK ABOUT A WOW FACTOR!