dry mounting using an iron

Discussion in 'Presentation & Marketing' started by CPorter, Apr 23, 2013.

  1. CPorter

    CPorter Member

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    .....your thoughts on it, feasible? I've no dry mount press and I do not forsee one in the future, funds are quite limited these days, frustratingly so.....
     
  2. wildbill

    wildbill Member

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    yes, for small prints if you're careful. I wouldn't use it for work I was selling though.
     
  3. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    Use the very lowest setting (silk) on the iron. At one time people did this routinely.
     
  4. ann

    ann Subscriber

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    I did it many years ago, nothing larger than 8x10 and used a piece of "kraft " paper on top of the print for protection.
     
  5. Worker 11811

    Worker 11811 Member

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    I've done it and, if done carefully, it works.

    I've also burned a few prints doing it that way.

    Set the iron on "low." If it is a steam iron (most are, these days) be sure there is no water in the tank. Dry iron only.
    Cover the print with a piece of clean paper to protect the surface. Use even pressure and keep the iron moving but not too fast.

    Practice on a few scrap prints until you get the hang of it.
     
  6. CPorter

    CPorter Member

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    Thanks all.....glad to know some have done it successfully.
     
  7. aarontalcott

    aarontalcott Member

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    As noted above already, it's certainly feasible. It just requires a lot more time and diligence.

    With a meat thermometer I found the setting at which the iron was a maximum of 180 deg. F., made a mark with a sharpie at that point on the dial for later use. No water in the iron of course. At first I tried paper between the iron and the print, but found that this was prone to leaving crease marks on the print at the edges of the iron. Switching to archival mat board as a buffer solved that. Work carefully from one iron's section to the next, making sure you leave the iron pressed to the area long enough that all four layers (mat, dry mount tissue, print, buffer mat) reach the required temperature.

    It's time consuming, and you do have to be careful, but it does work.
     
  8. HTF III

    HTF III Member

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    I'll second this method.
     
  9. David Allen

    David Allen Member

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    In the years before I could afford a dry mounting press, I routinely mounted 20" x 16" using an iron. As others have stated, iron should not be too hot, you need to keep it flat and you just need to take it slow and have a board with some books ready (you need to remember that the way the tissue works in that the heat activates it but the permanent bond is formed as the tissue cools).

    I used to use silicon release paper between the print surface and the iron. Work your way from the center outwards and as soon as you have finished, cover with an archival board and place a good weight (four or five photographic monograph books should do the trick) and then leave it to cool for 30 minutes.

    It takes a bit of practice but can work very well.

    Best,

    David
    www.dsallen.de
     
  10. Jonathan R

    Jonathan R Member

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    As usual, David, you have told us exactly what we all needed to know! One question: is it necessary to make sure the mounting board is completely moisture-free (e.g. by ironing it separately), before proceeding with the mounting itself? Otherwise I can imagine the whole thing curling as it dries.
     
  11. David Allen

    David Allen Member

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    With dry mounting, it is essential to make sure all things are fully dry - this includes the board(s) that you are mounting on and the one you use above the print whilst it cools.

    You do not need to drive your self 'mad' with this, simply heat the board(s) with the iron and then place them on a dry place to cool down. As soon as the board(s) have cooled, then proceed with the mounting. If the room you are using is very dry anyway, store your boards there a day before mounting (NOTE: if, like me, the only place you have room for your dry mounting press is the darkroom, do not store your boards in the darkroom. Good quality archival mount boards are quite porous and easily absorb chemical moisture in the air).

    Best of luck with the mounting.

    Davod
    www.dsallen.de
     
  12. paul ron

    paul ron Member

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    did it fro many years before I got a real press.

    Just be sure to iron the print n the mount board to dry em good before actually doing the final mount or you will get bubbles n wrinkles.