dry-plate Tintype in glass plate holders

Discussion in 'Alternative Processes' started by TheFlyingCamera, Apr 20, 2007.

  1. TheFlyingCamera

    TheFlyingCamera Membership Council Council

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    I've got some glass plate holders, only a few of which are equipped with springs on the septum. Is it possible to use dry-plate tintypes in said holders without the springs, or do I need to make a spring or some other shim to go behind the tin plate, as tin plates are much thinner than glass plates.
     
  2. rwyoung

    rwyoung Member

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    You really should consider something behind the plate to keep it pressed into position.

    You could try cutting up a milk carton. If you cut a 1" wide strip around the peremeter, you can create a "spring" that looks a little like a recurve bow. It may take a few tries to get it sized right and then a little practice to hold it all in place while you close the back but the spring pressure will be gentle and should be sufficient.

    Otherwise, consider backing the "tin" with some glass to take up the rest of the room inside the holder. You may want to do this anyway to keep the spring (factory or fabricated) from bowing the tin out.
     
  3. kevin klein

    kevin klein Member

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    Yes, I use a piece of masking tape and make a loop adhesive side out and stick it to the septum of the holder, then put the plate on that. So far removing the tape from the paper septum has not caused any damage to it.

    You might want to use several to be sure the plate will lay flat.

    I just put the plate in the holder without shims,the thickness diference is not that great.

    If you have regular sheet film holders they can be used too.
    The only modification is to shave down the raized lip on the inside of the flap at the bottom of the holder so there will be more clearence for the thickness of the plate,otherwise the plate will have a tendancy to spring the flap outward and missalign the groove for the bottom of the darkslide.

    Also, the plate shuld be cut narower so as to fit between the film guides, and be sure the plate is long enugh to fit up under the top frame and within the recess in the bottom frame.

    Let us know how it works out for you.
    Happy Shooting.
     
  4. Allen Friday

    Allen Friday Member

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    When I shoot wet plate tin-types in a glass plate holder, I back the tin with a sheet of glass. Otherwise, the tin is not held flat in the holder. The spring casues the tin to bulge in the middle, sometimes so much that the tin will bump up against the darkslide. I have also used scrap peices of matt board.
     
  5. TheFlyingCamera

    TheFlyingCamera Membership Council Council

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    Will this be as great a problem if I use the black-anodized trophy aluminum, or does the material make a difference? I have more plate holders without springs than I do with them, so I suppose mat board as a backing would be fine. 4-ply?
     
  6. kevin klein

    kevin klein Member

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    I use trophy aluminum with no backing, you could try it but it might not be needed. Test fit to see.