Durst Laborator 1300 disassemble help

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by chromemax, Jan 25, 2010.

  1. chromemax

    chromemax Member

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    After a long research for a 5x7 enlarger finally I found a Durst Laborator 1300. The enlarger is in very good conditions but I have to disassemble it for transport, but I don't know how to do this and the user manual don't help (I didn't find a manteinance manual for this model).
    I think that the enlarger can be divided into 5 main parts: the head, the column, the power supply, the EST1000 and the ECU100 control unit, but how I can disassemble all these parts? For re-assemble the enlarger there is some "special" adjustment that can be done only by Durst engineers? Any help would be apreciated, thank you very much.

    Diego Ranieri
     
  2. RalphLambrecht

    RalphLambrecht Subscriber

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    Diego

    I do not know anything about the L1300, but if it is anything like the L1200, make sure to raise the head all the way up to the top, before taking it off, or the support will snap to the top and somebody can get hurt!
     
  3. chromemax

    chromemax Member

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    Thank you for your answer. The L1300 has a motorized coloumn so I think that there is no such problem with a counter-weighted support like the one on the L1200.
    Ragards
    Diego Ranieri
     
  4. Bob-D659

    Bob-D659 Member

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    Actually I would expect a motorized column to have a counterweight or spring system. Otherwise the motor system would have to be much larger and have a braking system to stop the head from crashing into the baseboard. With a counter weighted head, you only need a very small motor for head movement.
    Try contacting Durst for information.
     
  5. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

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    The L1300 is nearly identical to the L1840. The worm screw holds the head without a couterweight.

    The Durst literature refers to the bellows and lens stage as the "Camera" and the negative carrier and "Head" fit on top of that.

    The "Camera" does not come off the column.

    You should be able to "head" off with the 4 bolts like the L1840. The negative carrier also unscrews and the mixing box comes out.
    The control console and power supplies all unplug.
     
  6. AgX

    AgX Member

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  7. chromemax

    chromemax Member

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    Thank you very much for yours help, now it is a bit more clear to me how disassemble the L1300.
    A special thank to ic-racer and for his wonderful work on his L1840 and the very well documented thread on largeformatphotography forum. The coloumn of L1300 seems the same of the L1840 and I'm thinking to transport the enlarger with my car (a 7 seats suv) with the help of a friend, hoping that two person can transport the disassembled L1300. The coloumn seems to be the heaviest part, but I can't imagine how much it weight (there is the motor inside I suppose). Please ic-racer, on the base of your experience with L1840, can you tell me if four arms are enough?
    Thank you again

    Regards
    Diego Ranieri
     
  8. jerry lebens

    jerry lebens Member

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    It's years since I dismantled an L1840 but, if it is identical to the 1300, then the "camera" (as IC refers to it) may be removed from the column, making the whole easier to move.

    I don't recall the precise details but, after having removed any other moveable parts, the process involved loosening one (or both) of the large black locking knobs to the side of the head, then rotating the head to a pre set position (as if to project an image sideways) and pulling the whole"camera" assembly forward from the uprights. Before this is done and to remove the EXTREME tension on the spring (as mentioned by Ralph), the head must either be raised to the top of the column (which is inconvenient) or spragged beforehand in a lower position (I used to use a jubilee clip tightened around one of the columns). Care must be taken with this process because the spring is under enormous tension and, without the weight of the head to counteract it, the carriage assembly could cause serious injury if allowed to return unchecked. In short, having someone like an old fashioned auto mechanic or maintenance engineer and used to thinking on their feet, would be helpful.

    On the 1840 the vertical uprights could be separated into higher and lower sections by loosening the pinch bolts to the rear centre of the uprights. Broken down I managed to manhandle the whole unit by myself on occasion but I wouldn't recommend it, better if you have at least two, fairly fit, pairs of hands.

    Again, if the 1300 is identical to the 1840, there are nylon gears used in the train to raise and lower the head. These are fragile and can be stripped very easily. Worse still, there aren't any replacements available from Bolzano - I had to get replacements turned by an engineer...

    Regards
    Jerry
     
  9. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

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    jerry, I think you are confusing the L184 and the L1840.

    L1840 does not have a spring, nylon gears, vertical uprights etc.