Dusting 10x10 Glass Carrier and 8x10 Negatives

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by ic-racer, Jun 8, 2010.

  1. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

    Messages:
    7,485
    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2007
    Location:
    Midwest USA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I have been looking at that Kinetronics 280 11" dusting brush at B&H, but at almost $80 I thought of some alternatives.

    Anyone using a simple 13" $20 brush like this?

    [​IMG]
     
  2. richard ide

    richard ide Member

    Messages:
    1,227
    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2005
    Location:
    Wellington C
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I think you would regret it. Bristles are far too coarse. I have used only compressed air for 30 years. Kodak used to supply a good brush in a couple of sizes. IIRC 1" and 2". AFAIK they were made from squirrel hair. Try an art store and get a soft wide brush.
     
  3. langedp

    langedp Member

    Messages:
    144
    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2005
    Location:
    Michigan
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    That's going to scratch the heck out of your negatives. I don't even use my kinetronic's brush anymore. I just use the compressed air approach mentioned above for my 8x10 neg's. If the glass in the carrier needs more cleaning than that, I use a good glass cleaner and wear latex surgical gloves when handling the glass.
     
  4. JOSarff

    JOSarff Member

    Messages:
    203
    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2008
    Location:
    Santa Fe, NM
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    IC:

    Go to your favoerite paint and hardware store and buy a soft natural bristle (not boar) brush of 2 to 4 inches. That should work.
     
  5. michael_r

    michael_r Subscriber

    Messages:
    6,575
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2010
    Location:
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    What is a good glass cleaner for negative carriers - ie something that doesn't leave behind any sort of chemical residue that might damage negatives over time?
    thanks
     
  6. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

    Messages:
    7,485
    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2007
    Location:
    Midwest USA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I use Windex.
     
  7. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

    Messages:
    7,485
    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2007
    Location:
    Midwest USA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I already have a 2" antistatic brush. But the repeated swipes required for the 10x10 glass allow dust to re-settle on the glass creating a never ending sequence of events :smile:
     
  8. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

    Messages:
    7,485
    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2007
    Location:
    Midwest USA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I'd like to know more about those that are using compressed air. I have the cans but they are a whimpy for a big area of glass. My shop air compressor for air tools blows moisture and is quite loud. I'd have to put the compressor in another room and pipe the air in after going through a dryer and filter. Is that what you guys are doing?
     
  9. Greg Davis

    Greg Davis Member

    Messages:
    2,057
    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2004
    Location:
    Nicholasvill
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    Have you considered an anti-static device like the one Kodak used to make that emitted ionized particles while you brushed the film? I have one somewhere in storage, and it works great. The only reason I don't like compressed air is that it scatters the dust into the air and it then resettles onto the glass and film. On the other hand, I have a film of Sally Mann that shows her using some on her 8x10 carriers and film, so I guess it works for her.
     
  10. Curt

    Curt Subscriber

    Messages:
    4,560
    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2005
    Location:
    Pacific Nort
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
  11. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

    Messages:
    7,485
    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2007
    Location:
    Midwest USA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
  12. resummerfield

    resummerfield Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,363
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2005
    Location:
    Alaska
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I went down to the local artist's store and bought a 2-inch short bristle badger brush. It's a very fine and soft bristle, and I've never scratched a negative.
     
  13. richard ide

    richard ide Member

    Messages:
    1,227
    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2005
    Location:
    Wellington C
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    That framing brush will do the same job of scratching that the other one would. Guaranteed.

    I used to buy an aerosol antistatic spray from a graphic arts supplier. Very little on a piece of cotton cloth will help to keep dust at bay without leaving a residue.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 9, 2010
  14. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

    Messages:
    7,485
    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2007
    Location:
    Midwest USA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Scratching the glass?
     
  15. richard ide

    richard ide Member

    Messages:
    1,227
    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2005
    Location:
    Wellington C
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    That too in time. As well as using compressed air, I used only glass cleaner on lint free industrial wipes on the glass. You want a soft fine hair brush if you are going that route for both film and glass. Nothing else except glass cleaner.
    From the experience of hundreds of thousands of enlargements.
     
  16. clayne

    clayne Member

    Messages:
    2,836
    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2008
    Location:
    San Francisc
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    There is no way any of those is going to scratch glass. A negative maybe. Glass, definitely not. ICR I've had good luck with the cotton pads that FS sells. While they leave their own small amount of lint - the difference is this lint blows off very easily because it's more substantial in weight/size than simple dust particles. I clean the carriers at the beginning of every darkroom session or so - not every time I change negatives. I clean negatives before I put them in the carrier - but for that I use an expensive Kinetronics KSE device.

    These: http://www.freestylephoto.biz/232341-Webril-Wipes-4-x-4-100
     
  17. langedp

    langedp Member

    Messages:
    144
    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2005
    Location:
    Michigan
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    Windex works fine. No need to get too fancy. I take the glass out of my 10x10 carrier to clean it. That's why I use gloves when handling to keep the finger prints off.
     
  18. langedp

    langedp Member

    Messages:
    144
    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2005
    Location:
    Michigan
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    I have several air compressors but I just use canned air in the darkroom. I have a large 10x10 Durst horizontal enlarger with a big negative carrier. The canned air works fine. You don't need to blow the dust into the next county. Just enough to get it off the glass.

    I do use my Kinetronics brush on the glass from time to time but not on my negatives anymore. I've noticed very fine scratches on some of my negs from it. Keep the negative clean and in sleeves and compressed air should be all you need.
     
  19. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

    Messages:
    7,485
    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2007
    Location:
    Midwest USA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
  20. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

    Messages:
    8,003
    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2008
    Location:
    Los Angeles,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Hi,

    I would definitely get a moisture trap for your compressor, just on GP.

    As for noise, you can fill the tank ahead of time while you wait in a more quite area, and then turn off the automatic switch once it is full. You probably won't need more compressed air than is in a household-sized tank to clean the carrier any one time.

    Filling up the tank to more pressure than is needed, and using a regulator to control (decrease) the pressure that you will use to clean the carrier would be a good thing to do. You will then be working at a constant pressure (at least up to the point at which tank pressure falls below your regulator's setting), as opposed to working with constantly decreasing pressure. And that way you also won't be using excessive pressure, which can make more of a mess in your darkroom than the one you intended to clean up in the first place.

    Also, be sure to open the drain valve at the end of the session. Water will accumulate in the tank and rust if you do not. That means shorter tank life, and potentially more water in the hose.

    ...and even more importantly, don't forget to close the drain valve once the tank is emptied of fluid. If you don't close it, and you leave it on automatic, your compressor will run continuously to try to maintain pressure as the air leaks out, which will destroy it.

    And there is also ear protection. Always a good idea anyhow when working around compressors.

    I have a small compressor with a regulator and water trap. Instead of running a line from it to whatever I am working on each time, I have lines wired up through the garage and darkroom permanently, with a few attachment points. One is in the darkroom, and two in the garage. (The garage and darkroom are adjacent to each other on a semi-subterranean level of the house.)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 22, 2011
  21. Bob Carnie

    Bob Carnie Subscriber

    Messages:
    5,481
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2004
    Location:
    Toronto-Onta
    Shooter:
    Med. Format RF
    I use canned air.

    I will hold the negative at on edge and press air under the other edge.
    This makes the negative flop like a bass on dock after it is landed
    this action dislodges any dust quickly.
    I do not use brushes.

    This works well with 8x10 negs, you have to be a bit more careful with mf film as it is thinner.