DX/APS lenses on 35mm?

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by BetterSense, Dec 17, 2012.

  1. BetterSense

    BetterSense Member

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    Which APS lenses will work on 35mm? Does anyone use any digital-format lenses on 35mm with good results?

    Ordinarily, we assume that for example a Nikon DX lens will not cover 35mm because the DX format is smaller (same size as APS). However as large format photographers know, format coverage is relative, and some lenses will cover a larger format than they are advertised for, just with less sharpness in the corners. If you always use small apertures or you shoot at close ranges, you can get away with using a 4x5 lens on 5x7, for example.

    I have both a D70 and F801s. When I try my 18-55mm DX lens on my F801 (which has SUCH a better viewfinder...) the corners are dark at the wide setting, but this seems to go away completely near the 55mm setting. I reckon I could use this lens if I was pressed to do so.

    I'm shopping for a 35mm macro lens, and trying to decide if I should get a 35mm one or a DX one. For 35mm macro, a DX-format lens might actually be BETTER than a 35mm lens. Coverage should be no problem with extension rings or a bellows, and I assume DX lenses are at least as sharp or sharper than 35mm lenses within the limits of their coverage.
     
  2. EKDobbs

    EKDobbs Member

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    I suppose as long as you don't try to shoot with the aperture wide open it should work with the extensions, just possibly not as well as a run-of-the-mill 35mm. I don't really see the advantage of getting a DX over a 35mm MF lens unless you feel you really need the AF. Or is the DX cheaper?
     
  3. BetterSense

    BetterSense Member

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    Really? Why? I thought that DX lenses were sharper in the middle than 35mm, because they need to be for the smaller format.

    Some of the DX lenses are indeed cheap.
     
  4. MFstooges

    MFstooges Member

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    If you are not using pro bodies there is a chance you might get that vignette worst than you see. The non pro bodies don't have 100% VF coverage so what you see is not what you get.
     
  5. DWThomas

    DWThomas Subscriber

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    Hmmm -- isn't it possible there could be mirror interference using the smaller format on a full frame? I'm not familiar with the Nikon stuff, but I'm thinking at least some Canon EFS lenses can be a problem and have a nub somewhere that prevents mounting them on a full frame body. Because the mirrors in a "crop frame" body are smaller, the rear lens elements can be allowed to stick out closer to the film plane. No 1st hand experience -- thus far.
     
  6. Aja B

    Aja B Member

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    Aside from coverage the bigger problem is aperture control. Most modern lenses do not have aperture rings so 'f22 and be there' becomes the default setting on most bodies.
     
  7. BetterSense

    BetterSense Member

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    Good point about the aperture rings on Nikon G lenses. You have to set the aperture on the body for those. What does that mean for F4/5/6 where you CAN set the aperture on the body...in fact you have to set the lens to F22 in order to use the auto modes. Does this mean the "G" lenses will work on AF film bodies, so long as you don't try to use Manual modes?

    Of course most macro rings/bellows don't couple the aperture, so with those you truly are stuck at minimum aperture with G lenses.
     
  8. MFstooges

    MFstooges Member

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    I don't think you can set aperture on F4 body
     
  9. BetterSense

    BetterSense Member

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    The F4 body has a program mode, so obviously it can set aperture. It might force you to turn the aperture ring when you use the more-manual modes, though.
     
  10. Kav

    Kav Member

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    I tried out the 35mm 1.8g and 18-55mm kit lenses (both DX lenses) on my F4. The Lenses will work with the two program modes and if I recall the shutter mode. The 35mm needs to be shot pretty well wide open to prevent the corners of the frame darkening. So I used the hi program mode. (It attempts to use higher shutter speeds so it is more likely to keep the lens wide open. The 18-55mm is totally usable zoomed in past about 22mm.

    Here's a few photos shot with those two lenses on the F4:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  11. LJSLATER

    LJSLATER Member

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    G lenses work on almost every autofocus Nikon. I have personal experience with the F4, on which G lenses work, but you are limited to P and S mode. VR doesn't work, but AF-S does even though the F4 predates AF-S technology by quite a while!

    I'm pretty sure APS-C lenses can't be used on anything other than the Proneas, but DX lenses can indeed be used on 35mm bodies as well as FX. The amount of falloff varies from lens to lens. It also varies based on aperture, focal length, and focus setting. A lot of Thom Hogan's reviews of DX zooms will tell you what focal lengths are usable without vignetting: http://www.bythom.com

    Edit: Also look at Kav's brilliant post above! We posted at the same time but his is much more useful.
     
  12. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    I would not assume anything but rather check the resolution of both types of lenses. Due to the limitations of the digital sensors lenses for these cameras can have lower resolution.
     
  13. PentaxBronica

    PentaxBronica Member

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    Some lenses sold for DSLRs are based on existing film designs. There's strong evidence to suggest that the Pentax DA 35mm f2.4 is based on the FA 35mm f2, and the DA40 looks suspiciously similar to the old Pentax-M 40mm. Both have been tested on film and found perfectly usable, although you need a body capable of controlling the aperture as neither lens has an aperture ring.
     
  14. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    I have put several Nikon lenses on my APS camera and on my D70. Some of the lenses protrude too deeply into the APS body cavity and inhibit the motion of the mirror. When I try APS lenses or my D70 lenses on my 2020 or other Nikons, there is severe vignetting. as in the photo in post #10.

    Not all auto modes work, but most do. My best choice is my Micro Nikkor which works on all 3 camera series, APS, 35mm and digital.

    PE
     
  15. MFstooges

    MFstooges Member

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    I got it wrong then, I thought you meant to manually set the aperture on the body.

    My understanding is the digital sensor has higher resolution than film --> higher lens resolution. No?
     
  16. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Lower than and smaller than!

    PE
     
  17. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    This is what the makers of digital cameras would like you to believe. Each cell in a digital sensor is a macroscopic entity. The individual grains in a photographic emulsion are microscopic. While the resolution of digital cameras has improved it still lags far behind that of film. The lenses for digital cameras do not have to meet the same speciifications as those for film cameras. Would you put a Ferrari engine in a go-cart?