Dynamic Range: Velvia 50, Ekatachrome E100G, E200 and Provia 400X

Discussion in 'Exposure Discussion' started by JPR, Feb 21, 2011.

  1. JPR

    JPR Member

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    Dear All

    So, I'm going to do some shooting with Velvia 50, E100G, E200 and Povia 400X. (All films in production as of February 2011...) I need to take some pictures of "white masks" in bright light, so I need to know the dynamic range of the films to avoid burned highlights.

    I managed to have time to make a zone exposure test for Velvia 50 and E200. I tested 11 differnt exposures 0 to 10, setting 5 as the base meter reading. I used 3 different lenses: Summicron-M 35 ASPH, Color-Heliar 75 and Summilux-M 50 ASPH.

    Does anybody know, if E100G has approximately the same exposure lattiude as E200? This would save me burning a roll of film for a test! :D Also, I suppose that Velvia 50 and Provia 400X are so different that there's now way around avoding a test, or? ...

    Thanks for any feedback you may have in advance! I took my film in for development today, so I'll post next weekend the results in a different thread!

    Cheers, JPR
     
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  2. lxdude

    lxdude Member

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    Hurry up and buy any E200 you want to get, as it's just been discontinued. :sad:
     
  3. hrst

    hrst Member

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    You can also try: Provia 100F, Velvia 100F and Velvia 100, those are also in production. But, no need to test Velvia 100F and Velvia 100, those have even less exposure latitude than Velvia 50. Then again, Provia 100F has more and is a very sharp and fine-grained film. If you can get some Astia 100F, which may or may not be discontinued, it has the widest exposure latitude in Fuji's reversal film range. I would go with Astia 100F if you can get it and if ISO 100 is enough for your purpose. It's definitely the one for the situation you describe.
     
  4. benjiboy

    benjiboy Subscriber

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    I would advise you not to overcomplicate things, just take an incidental light reading then reduce the indicated exposure by 1/2 to 1 stop.
     
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  5. Athiril

    Athiril Subscriber

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    Velvia 50 has more saturation/contrast though?
     
  6. Klainmeister

    Klainmeister Member

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    Velvia 50 has quite the contrast and saturation--mostly in the forms of Reds and Greens. I don't think I'd recommend it for your purposes. It's a very narrow film and I've had my fair share of shots that are 1/4 stop overexposed and it's toast. That being said, I once took a picture of light falling through a hole in a cave...there was a 7 stop difference and the film managed all of it (minus some blowouts in the main light). Give Provia a try. It's not as saturated, but ultimately you'll have more latitude.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/16894355@N07/3573914290/sizes/l/
     
  7. benjiboy

    benjiboy Subscriber

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    Each Zone on the Zone System is a full stop, with transparency film 1/3 of a stop can make a big difference, and you have to think backwards, because unlike negative films the more exposure you give slide films the lighter the result, I really wouldn't recommend this method.
     
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  8. lxdude

    lxdude Member

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    ^^YEP^^ Use 1/4 stop increments to do a tight evaluation.