E-6 not clear after processing?

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by bblhed, Feb 26, 2011.

  1. bblhed

    bblhed Member

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    I finished up processing two rolls of E-6 film using the 3 part kit, and hung them to dry but they dried with the carrier looking dark blue instead of clear, even on the film ends.

    This is the kit that Freestyle sells that goes 1ST developer, Color Developer, BLIX.

    I am just wondering what part of the process has gone bad on me? I have used these chemicals before with no problems, and they are less than 6 months old but still I'm out two rolls of memories.

    So can anyone tell me what went wrong? Also I have a feeling that there is no hope, but is there anything that could fix this on these rolls of film?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Could be one of several things such as incomplete first development, improper reversal (fog) step or several others OTOMH. Sorry. Can you scan in a sample with sprocket holes and edges?

    PE
     
  3. hrst

    hrst Member

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    Is it "milky" or "diffused"? I mean, if you look through it (for example that dark blue section), can you see clearly and sharply through it?
     
  4. bblhed

    bblhed Member

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    Oh, it's nice and clear blue, clean with no water marks, I will try to post a scan after I look at on a light table so I really know what I lost.
     
  5. hrst

    hrst Member

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    So, you have dark blue instead of whites, resulting in very dark images, and very dark edge markings (normally they would be yellow)? Very short first developer time, or very low temperature (like room temperature or something like that), or faulty/exhausted first developer might be the cause... The problems in fogging color developer would probably cause too light images, and the problems in blix could cause milkiness.
     
  6. bblhed

    bblhed Member

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    Alright, here it is, my E-6 mess up, Please excuse the photo format, these are from a Kodak Stereo Camera so the photos are little, they overlap on some edges, and there are a few blank (dark) frames because when the film starts and ends the camera can't use some of the frames. I love this camera and started processing E-6 at home because of it, I send out my standard slides, but I do the stereo slides at home.

    [​IMG]

    You have to blow it up, but you can read Kodak E6 and the frame numbers on the rebate.
     
  7. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Although it does not appear blue on my monitor, I don't see edge markings. This hints at gross underdevelopment in the 1st developer. But, OTOH, there is some reversal image as seen in the light spots. I think that you have more than one problem. It appears as if the film might be under bleached and under fixed as well.

    How old was the kit as a concentrate on your shelf, and how long were the diluted solutions sitting around?

    I have a Kodak Stereo camera as well so I am familiar with the format. It was no problem at all.

    PE
     
  8. bblhed

    bblhed Member

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    I had a feeling and I know my luck but I was holding out hope that another run of BLIX could fix it. Well, time for a new E-6 Kit, and I won't push it as far. As for temp, I was at between 104 and 105 on the same thermometer I have always used for E-6 just as always, and I tempered the chemicals for about an hour as I normally do.
     
  9. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Try putting it back in the Blix, that'll possibly cure the problem, but first shake the blix well in a part filled bottle, that helps regenerate the bleach.

    The problem is there are VERY few good 3 bath E-6 kits, the best disappeared when Championed got the Kodak chemistry contract, they ditched Photocolor (Paterson).

    Ian
     
  10. bblhed

    bblhed Member

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    As for the film not being blue on your monitor, we will go with my film scanning software is not top notch and leave it at that.

    The kit is about 6 months old mixed, and this is the second time use for it.

    I am guessing that next time I should just save all my stereo film and do it all at once, you are supposed to be able to get three shots with this kit, and I seclude my first stage developer, the first second use went just fine.

    Explanation of secluding developer: I have a 1 quart kit so I use half the chemicals each time and the used does not go back with the unused.

    Color and BLIX do go back in their original mixed containers, the instructions said this should be fine.
     
  11. bblhed

    bblhed Member

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    Thank you everyone for all your help!

    I will be more careful next time and try to use up the mixed solutions faster. Dating the mixed chemicals wouldn't hurt either, I date my D-76, but didn't think I would have this E-6 for as long as I did.

    Thank you again.
     
  12. hrst

    hrst Member

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    6 months is really pushing too far if you are not sure what you are doing.... That is, I have had very good results with chemistry more than 6 months old, but there are a few conditions
    - it must be unused (not partially used)
    - you must use bottles with absolutely no air inside (well squeezed PET bottles for example)
    - when making up the developers in tap water, you should let the water sit for a while, preferably warm it up and let it cool down, to remove the dissolved oxygen.
    - using distilled water instead of tap water may help in some cases
    - decreasing the storage temperature may help a lot, but don't go too low or it may precipitate or freeze. (I store them at +4 deg C without problems but cannot guarantee anything below +10 deg C.)

    Unless you can satisfy these conditions, I wouldn't push the storage guidelines -- usually given as 2 to 4 weeks for partly used developer -- much further.
     
  13. Photo Engineer

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    The reversal step may have been bad then. IDK what they use in the kit you used, but often this chemistry goes bad quickly. If you used light reversal, it was drastically insufficient. But, as I said, at least 2 problems if not more. Rebleaching and fixing might help, but if the blix is totally bad, there is no help there. You need a fresh bleach and fix.

    PE