e-6 problems

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by R Paul, Apr 22, 2011.

  1. R Paul

    R Paul Member

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    Hi guys

    I have noticed lately that I have had reticulation problems with some of my film. I had just processed a set of fuji provia and some color ir film together, and while the fuji came out fine , there are traces of reticulation in the color ir, like a background graininess
    It does seem to be a much thinner film than usual, and to be honest I forgot the pre-bleach step ,but I thought both would have the same problem. I did the final rinse with formalin
    any ideas?
    rob
     
  2. hrst

    hrst Member

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    If you forgot the pre-bleach, you can try to run the tail end of the process again, starting from the pre-bleach: pre-bleach, bleach, fix, wash, final rinse. This will correct the possible underbleaching resulting from the lack of pre-bleach.

    Reticulation sounds very weird, it should not be easily possible with color films unless you have messed up VERY badly with temperatures. Retained silver (incomplete bleaching) can cause a grainy effect of similar kind.
     
  3. R Paul

    R Paul Member

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    Hi
    well the temp controller was on target and the rolls of fuji came out fine. The only thing I could think of was that jobo recommends 6:20 for kodak film and 7:20 for fuji I have also seen this on some VPS i was cross processing as e-6.
    Most of the emulsion actually melted off the backing( I was pushing it x3)

    It actually looks like a piece of ground glass when you look through the film, especially when you zoom in on the sky or a clear spot , you can see tiny,tiny spots

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/59235433@N05/5645960557/in/photostream/

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/59235433@N05/5645960577/
    I hope this can worked out ,cause that film can take some really stunning pictures
    thanks
    rob
     
  4. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    I see no evidence of reticulation in the posted pictures. I do see what appears to be scuff marks and abrasion along with a streak of some sort.

    Pushing should not affect the film, but misprocessing can. What process was the IR intended for. There are or were 3 IR films for 3 different processes (E4, E5 and E6).

    PE
     
  5. R Paul

    R Paul Member

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    Hello PE
    this is the repackaged EIR Aerochrome film now being sold online dated 2009. It is labeled process e-6.
    the scratches I know came from processing as that portion got loose from the reel and was banged up in the tank. ( it's always the nicest ones get messed up) The emulsion side is a dull matte, not glossy,and if you look through the film the base isn't clear but frosted, almost like ground glass, that is what bothers me. Did I do something,or is it inherent in the film itself. The attached picture should help
    thanks again
    rob
     

    Attached Files:

  6. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    My comment was regarding the apparent absence of what is classic reticulation. It appears like a dried mud flat with tiny wormlike threads running through the image. The slight haze on the surface may be the nature of the special Aerochrome film, or may be due to the omission of the formalin pre-bleach. I can't comment on the former at all and I cannot comment on the latter until you run a "correct" E6 process with all of the steps. The formalin pre-bleach may contain enough formalin to prevent any of the effect you see.

    PE
     
  7. R Paul

    R Paul Member

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    It was the haze that bothered me, and I agree that it could be either of the two things you mentioned. I guess the only way to find out is go shoot some more film, run it correctly and see what happens.
    maybe do a clip test first-- run a unexposed piece thru and see how it looks At 28 dollars a roll the stuff is too pricey to throw around, though it does look nice. Will let you know once I get enough film for a developing run.
    Thanks again
    rob
     
  8. R Paul

    R Paul Member

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    Dear PE
    It was the lack of pre-bleach in the setup that did the damage.
    Just ran another roll and it's okay
    rob
     
  9. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    And this illustrates the problem with using other kits which do not use a pre-bleach.

    Glad to hear things are ok now.

    PE