E-6 Processing woes

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by Jacko1729, Aug 2, 2006.

  1. Jacko1729

    Jacko1729 Member

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    Hello all ... after a long absense from film shooting I have 'come back'. Unfortunately I had sold off my darkroom equipment except for a film development tank. Well, the first few batches of film were fine, but the plastic/rubber lid began to leak and I think I contaminated the last couple of batches or something, because of the horrible results. Before I mix any fresh chemistry, I need another tank (I've been doing this 'by hand' and don't have a processor, in the past with great results), so I guess I'm asking what tank would you guys recommend for 35mm? I usually process 2 rolls at the time, sometimes 4, but I want one that just won't leak. I've bid on a jobo 'starter kit' but was wondering if this is a good way to go, using the jobo tanks.

    I'm dying to get some good chromes, so do any of you folks have a suggestion or two?

    Many thanks!

    Jack
     
  2. Markok765

    Markok765 Member

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    Do you need a rotary processor? if not, try the paterson super system 4 tank
     
  3. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

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    If you want a lid that doesn't leak get a Jobo. I guess the 1520 if you want a small two reel tank. You'll get to choose plastic or hewes reels. If you later decide 2 reels aren't enough you can just buy the extension, some more reels and run more film in the same tank.

    If you're using a processor then you can consider the 2500 type tanks. But in inversion mode they use a lot more chemicals. OTOH the tanks can also handle 4x5 with a reel change.
     
  4. Jacko1729

    Jacko1729 Member

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    Thanks Mark. I don't need a rotary processor. I looked at the paterson, and it just might be the ticket.
     
  5. Jacko1729

    Jacko1729 Member

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    Thanks Nick, I'm looking at the Jobo. I don't know if it was the leak or my carelessness that caused my problem, but to do inversion processing it seems foolish to be spilling chemicals into my water bath, so this will at least eliminate that problem.
     
  6. Markok765

    Markok765 Member

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    I love the paterson system. one question: does it still have the plastic stick you put in the hole and turn to agitate? Your paterson system will last you a long time. Make sure to clean those plastic reels well! the paterson reels are the smoothest plastic and easiest to load IMO
     
  7. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Member

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    Dear Jack,

    Kindermann stainless steel with plastic lids. Much better heat transfer; negligible thermal capacity; last forever (I bought mine second-hand 30+ years ago). I don't think I'd try to do 4 in any tank without a processor, though -- I find a CPE-2 MUCH more efficient.

    Cheers,

    Roger (www.rogerandfrances.com)
     
  8. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

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    Actually think both are negatives. They may heat up quicker but the flip side is they cool down quicker. When I get a tank to the right temp I want it to stay there.
     
  9. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Member

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    Not in a water bath -- which you more or less have to use for E6. How much warmer does the first dev have to be to heat a plastic tank and reels to the temperature you want? And then it's the water-bath anyway.

    Sure you can pre-heat, but then, you can do this quicker with stainless.

    I fully take your point, and both are valid approaches, but obviously I prefer mine.

    Cheers,

    Roger (www.rogerandfrances.com)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 3, 2006
  10. PhotoJim

    PhotoJim Member

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    I second the vote for Paterson tanks. The reels are easy to load and can adjust to take 127 and 120/220/620 film. You can get larger tanks that will take as many as 8 rolls of 35mm. (I have one of these and it is a big timesaver when I get way behind in my processing. :smile: ) I don't use the stir stick that comes with it (which is supposed to be used to get rid of air bells); I invert. All plastic tanks will leak a tiny bit but the leakage I get with Paterson is fine.

    For E6 I use a Jobo processor and tank. The processor is all manual but the Jobo tanks fit magnetically on the spindle which is convenient. I don't like the Jobo reels as much - they are harder to load, although not bad once you get used to them.
     
  11. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Member

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    Funny, Jim: I find the Jobo spools easier to load than Paterson. Personal choice...

    Cheers,

    Roger (www.rogerandfrances.com)
     
  12. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

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    Big advantage to the Jobos is you don't have to buy a whole tank to go big. Just get the extension. My Jobos don't leak. If they did they would short out the motorbase I spin them on.

    The Jobo reels take a change of mindset if you've used the Patersons for a long time. You're so used to the Paterson reels that your hands want to turn the Jobo reels into Patersons.
     
  13. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    I am sold on the Jobo tanks and processor. Mine you I also have Durst tanks which I used to use for B&W and they didn't leak either. I have used Paterson tanks when I took a B&W night school course.

    While the Jobo reels don't have the ball bearing rachet system, I actually find thiem easier to use. Of course the Paterson tanks were the property of the college and got a lot of use so maybe were worn or not cleaned properly.

    Jobo equipment seems to be particularly well made.

    pentaxuser
     
  14. Jacko1729

    Jacko1729 Member

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    Thanks everyone, I really appreciate the replies. I'm leaning toward getting a Jobo processor (if I win the auction), but at least I have a good idea regarding tanks.
     
  15. PhotoJim

    PhotoJim Member

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    My oldest Paterson reel is 30 years old and it still works fine, although it's very yellow with age. Then again I don't hurl the reels to the floor or anything.

    Some people say that stainless steel reels are really easy to use, so maybe it is just an issue of personal choice.

    I like the extenders that the Jobo tanks have but I have occasionally put it on the tank improperly and had major leaks. Oops. :smile:

    I do film in batches so I like to have multiple tanks in different sizes, so the Paterson system has no real disadvantage for me.

    If I had to use Jobo henceforth, I'd be fine. But I really do hate loading 120 film into those reels. :smile: