E6 Processing Times

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by GrantR, Aug 27, 2008.

  1. GrantR

    GrantR Member

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    I've been processing a lot of slides recently in my JOBO CPP--when I process 100 ASA film, I consistently get good results, the 50 ASA film has been giving me a little bit of trouble, and I have adjusted my first development times and gotten acceptable results. I now have some rolls of 200 ASA film to process, and my question is this: As a predominately B&W processor, I am used to changing development times to adjust for different speed films, is E6 processing supposed to be a completely straightforward process where the first developer time remains consistently 7 minutes(because it is rotary drum), or does it change with film speeds?
     
  2. srs5694

    srs5694 Member

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    E6 process times are supposed to be consistent from one speed to another. Many people say they get better results by giving Fuji films a little more time than Kodak films, though. If your ISO 50 and ISO 100 films were made by different manufacturers, you might have been running into this.
     
  3. PHOTOTONE

    PHOTOTONE Member

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    It is perfectly OK to adjust the first developer time a minor amount, as your "style" of processing may affect the end results. By style, I mean how quickly you pour in the solution, how you agitate (speed, frequency), how quickly you pour out the solution, how accurate your temperature control is, etc. I use a deep tank (3.5 gallon) in a water-jacket sink. I regularly adjust my first developer time based on age of chemistry, and type of film developed. (Based on my near 40 years experience). My average first developer time with fresh chemistry and Kodak film is about 6:45. For Fuji film, a slight bit longer. I use a combination of nitrogen burst and hand agitation in the developer steps, and compressed air and hand agitation in the bleach, fix and wash steps.

    Having said that, all the commercial processing of E-6 roll film (not custom lab) is done on automatic machines that do not allow you to vary the processing times, hence all E-6 films from a given manufacturer are designed for identical processing times...but, for me, I have to adjust for my optimum.
     
  4. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Fuji and Kodak recommend different titmes for the first developer in E6. See their websites for recommended changes.

    PE
     
  5. GrantR

    GrantR Member

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    Great--that answers that! Thanks!