Eco Pro eco friendly BW paper developer problems

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by CatLABS, Apr 8, 2012.

  1. CatLABS

    CatLABS Subscriber

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    The darkroom at the Uni where i teach recently started using "Eco Pro" eco friendly BW paper dev.

    This stuff has no hydro quinine, and i was told that it oxidizes pretty fast because of that, and that i should watch out for it.

    Lately, my students have been complaining that the Dev is dead, after about an hour, and maybe 5-7 people working at the same time on 1 gallon of Dev mixed 1:9.

    They end up wasting so much time (and material) until they figure out the Dev is reacting to slow, and i am not always there to catch up on it.

    This is insane, but i have to use this stuff for now. I end up replenishing the Dev once or twice during the class to keep it going.

    A colleague suggested mixing it at 1:4 instead and hoping for better results.

    Is anyone using this stuff and getting different results?

    Any other ideas (other then using something else)...?
     
  2. donkee

    donkee Member

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    Maybe contact the company for advice or use something else.
     
  3. Andrew O'Neill

    Andrew O'Neill Subscriber

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    Is the university making you use these chems? Sounds like it's going to cost a lot in the long run. Use it up, and go to more reliable stuff that's been in darkrooms forever.

    andrew
     
  4. Hal Reiser

    Hal Reiser Member

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    I've been using this developer for the last two years and have not experienced any sort of problem as you describe.

    I mix it at the recommended 1:9 dilution but mix it in 1 quart batches. My darkroom sessions usually last 8 to 10 hours and I usually average 30 to 35 8 x 10 sheets through the solution.

    Developing time for me is 1min 30 sec and that remains constant through out the entire session.

    I don't get to spend a lot of time in the darkroom so I only purchase the developer in quarts. The concentrate is stored in a glass bottle and closed with a Vac-u- Vin stopper to remove the air as the bottle empties. A quart will last me several months and there has been no problems with the concentrate even when I reach the bottom of the bottle.

    Hal
     
  5. jelke

    jelke Member

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    i am using this developer

    http://www.moersch-photochemie.de/content/shop/positiv/110

    as you can read The stock solution has a shelf life of 4 years. When opened and depending on the filling level in the bottle this reduces to approximately 2 years. The working solution has a shelf life of 8 months if stored in a bottle.

    also it is the best developer i have ever used
     
  6. Mark Fisher

    Mark Fisher Subscriber

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    I love the stuff, but you are working it pretty hard. You might try the next tray size up rather than reducing the dilution...or in combination with some reduction in dilution.
     
  7. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    Switch to Ethol LPD, far more economical in the long run, just as "eco" friendly.
     
  8. Neal

    Neal Subscriber

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    Dear krifartida,

    Your experience matches mine. I love the product, but I do miss the staying power of Dektol. My reaction to the situation has been to go with the lower dilution and replenishing. While I obviously don't have the throughput you have, such a tactic might work. There is, of course, the possible argument of going back to a hydroquinone based developer (LPD is one of them) as you will be putting a smaller amount of developer down the drain.

    Good luck,

    Neal Wydra
     
  9. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Try Liquidol. It has at least 2x the staying power (capacity) of Dektol.

    PE
     
  10. Neal

    Neal Subscriber

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    Hi PE,

    Liquidol has the same issue with hydroquinone. Personally, I can't see how the tiny amount that hobbyists might discharge could cause a problem, but not everyone agrees.

    Neal Wydra
     
  11. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Neal;

    I cannot disagree however, at the present time, you get one or the other - stability or no HQ.

    But, Eco Pro is an excellent developer. I hope to figure out how to do better someday.

    PE
     
  12. brianmquinn

    brianmquinn Member

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    Just a thought, are you using tap or distilled water to mix up your developer. Tap water in some areas could have minerals in it that shorten the life of the working solution. Try distilled water for a batch and see if it lasts longer. Also is there is a chemistry department at your university? They often have de-ionized water on tap in their buildings. If you ask nice I am sure you could get gallons of it for free. After all a darkroom is really a chemistry lab.
     
  13. Richard Jepsen

    Richard Jepsen Member

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    I see the appeal of Eco Pro. In fact I've used it for our community art center DR at one time. Your working the solution too hard or its shelf live is pooping out. Establish a paper capacity count and train students on changing out solutions. Someone is ordering supplies and your argument will be cost which may be trumped by real & perceived environmental advantages.
     
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