Economics and workflow?

Discussion in 'Presentation & Marketing' started by Nicole, Oct 19, 2004.

  1. Nicole

    Nicole Member

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    Hi, firstly I'd like to apologise if this thread has been entered into the wrong area as I wasn't quite sure whether it should be here or in the Lounge.

    Since my conversion from digital to film my workflow is way out of whack and I'm getting a little frustrated here... :sad:

    I don't have a darkroom yet and so everything is still going to the lab for anything and everything - but gee it's soooo costly!

    I'd love to hear about your different workflow styles to find the most economic and professional way (for home and clients) for

    1) Processing
    2) Proofing
    3) Selecting
    4) Presenting and
    5) Printing
    6) Filing
    7) Storing

    I look forward to your replies in great anticipation......... :smile:

    Kind regards
    Nicole
     
  2. Nicole

    Nicole Member

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    Also.....
    I only have a photo flatbed scanner. Is it worth investing in a neg scanner?
    Cheers everyone
    Nicole
     
  3. doughowk

    doughowk Subscriber

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    Important reasons for doing your own work are quality & artistic control - ever try to convince even good labs that the print they created for you doesn't match your vision. I've even had a Kodak lab blister my film (stop bath too strong?) while typical local labs just scratch the film. So I decided to do all my own work from processing to printing. Most of your questions can be answered by a best-practices darkroom book (eg, Way Beyond Monochrome ), but most importantly is learn quality control/consistency in what you do. Its a hands-on process/craft that doesn't require expensive equipment to achieve good results.
     
  4. ann

    ann Subscriber

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    Why don't you pm Cheryl as i am sure she can give you some good advise as i know she does not do all her own work (client type).
     
  5. Nicole

    Nicole Member

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    Thanks Ann, done! :smile:
    Kind regards,
    Nicole
     
  6. Aggie

    Aggie Member

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    my work flow, using a darkroom.

    1. develop film
    2. contact sheet
    3. work prints
    4. select
    5. print and work on final image
    6. Tone or other post printing techniques
    7. Mat and present.
     
  7. Jim Chinn

    Jim Chinn Member

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    Here is the workflow from two night ago.

    1. Warm up enlarger
    2. prep chemistry
    3. prep negatives
    4. step on pointy Barby Doll breasts from doll left by children in corner of darkroom.

    5. Curse LOUDLY

    6. Be chewed out by wife for cursing LOUDLY. Told to look before I walk next time.

    7. Put away the negatvies
    8. Put away the chemistry
    9. turn off the enlarger

    10. smoke cigar while foot rests on ice bag on the patio.
    11. shake head and give out a sigh.
     
  8. Nicole

    Nicole Member

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    Thanks Aggie. How big do you normally make your work prints?

    Jim, you crack me up!!! :smile:)
     
  9. Aggie

    Aggie Member

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    work prints are 8x10. That is big enough to see most the details, and explore if I want to crop the image.