Edges/Rebates not clear after development?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by GarageBoy, Jul 8, 2013.

  1. GarageBoy

    GarageBoy Member

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    So, after loading a roll of film in 90+ degree heat and high humidity in a changing bag (wont try that again) I managed to put a tiny kink on the sprocket hole areas of the roll and thus it remained undeveloped on that spot.

    BUT, there are other areas on the rebates that show clumps of silver. Is this normal, or are the rebates supposed to be 100% clear with text?

    Thanks
     
  2. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    They should be clear with text visible. Try refixing to clear them.
     
  3. GarageBoy

    GarageBoy Member

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    They're clear, but with dark spots, I'll grab a photo of the negatives later
    Thanks
     
  4. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    It sounds like the hypo did not clear the film completely.
     
  5. GarageBoy

    GarageBoy Member

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    [​IMG]

    Also, REALLY dense negatives

    Agitation issue?
     
  6. polyglot

    polyglot Member

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    You have flow-marks around your sprocket holes, which would usually indicate too-vigorous agitation. And yes, those are very over-developed photos.

    The kink in 14A and the spots by the 26 and between 25 & Kodak are stress exposures from loading. If you bend or crush film, it becomes activated and will develop out with additional density as you can see here.
     
  7. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    Those "clumps" are surge marks.

    The type or strength of agitation you used caused the developer to surge through the sprocket holes at a fairly high speed. Where that happens, the film over-develops.

    Really dense negatives can also be caused by over-development.
     
  8. GarageBoy

    GarageBoy Member

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    Thanks, the kinks were from cutting the leader poorly, and humidity, ugh
    I'm developing a single roll in a two reel Paterson tank (both reels in), how do I prevent the surge marks?

    Kodak's specs say, invert 5-7 in 5 seconds, which seems aggressive and when I finish and place it back on the counter, I can hear the developer rush back down for a second or two. When I invert, am I supposed to let all of the developer drain towards the cap (due to it being half full?), or just go back and forth quickly?

    [​IMG] This is what the "thick" negative came out to be on the scan
     
  9. clayne

    clayne Member

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    As I mentioned on RFF, I don't think the negs are that bad off - definitely usable stuff still. Be firm, but smooth with agitation. 7 cycles per 5 seconds is too much. Stick to 4-5 per 5-7 seconds, max.
     
  10. polyglot

    polyglot Member

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    One inversion per second, where an inversion is 180 degrees of rotation. Let the developer completely slosh down to the far end of the tank gently, and come to rest before inverting again.
     
  11. frank

    frank Member

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    I'm a twirler, not an inverter.
     
  12. wiedzmin

    wiedzmin Subscriber

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    I found that if agitating by inversions and using 2 reel tank, I have better results when using developer etc. volume which covers both reels regardless if only one reel is loaded with film. I use recommended volume per 2 reels (it should be written on the bottom of the tank). Do not fill up tank completely because liquids wont have a room to move while agitating.
     
  13. frank

    frank Member

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    Here's your answer. Filling a 2 reel tank half full when developing only one film and inverting, causes too aggressive/violent agitation.
     
  14. polyglot

    polyglot Member

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    Stop that, it's disgusting!

    :wink:

    Seriously though, the twirl-stick method is not recommended in Paterson tanks because it is not sufficient agitation. You will get uneven development, especially with high dilution developers. You must invert unless you put them on a rotary base and roll.
     
  15. frank

    frank Member

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    I've been doing it this way for a long time with no problems.
    Besides, high dilution developers are often used with stand development where there is no agitation at all (after the first 1/2 to 1 minute).
     
  16. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    That's the way I roll. Occasionally for one roll of black & white I will invert.