Educate me on Tri-X in D76?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by buzzardkid, Nov 26, 2011.

  1. buzzardkid

    buzzardkid Member

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    Hi,

    first thread starting there.

    I got me some Tri-X last month in Berlin and am planning to 'traditionally' develop it in D76.

    It's going to be my maiden voyage with this combo. Until now I shot RolleiRetro100 w/ Rodinal, but a good friend's results with Tri-X inspired me to take a shot at it myself. However, he doesn't home-develop and I thought it best to turn to the fine people here to get educated on the specifics of D76 and Tri-X.

    I have three bags of D76 powder developer lying about and would like details on mixing, storing and shelf life.

    The Tri-X 400 I shot @800, so will be pushing one stop. Anyone that can recommend a good set of developing times, temps and turns?


    Much obliged!
     
  2. markbarendt

    markbarendt Subscriber

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  3. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    If you are concerned for purity, mix with deionized or distilled water. I keep my D-76 stored in one liter, and 250ml bottles filled to the top and tightly capped. I have some that is over one year old stored this way that still works as well as the day after it was mixed. I never use D-76 until at least one day after mixing to insure stability, entrained air settled out and such. Best thing to do after that is experiment.
     
  4. Richard S. (rich815)

    Richard S. (rich815) Subscriber

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    Does your friend push it to 800 too?
     
  5. buzzardkid

    buzzardkid Member

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    yup.

    But he has it developed, at Foto Impex in Berlin. Don't know what developer they use, likely something more modern than D76.

    Anyway, I have three bags of D76 and it's the better choice over Rodinal, so D76 it's gonna be.



    Still interested in storage temp, shelf life etc. Anyone that can educate me? Thanks!
     
  6. buzzardkid

    buzzardkid Member

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    'nother question: Do you guys re-use the developer? Or use it once-only?

    If re-using, how many times, on average?
     
  7. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    Years ago I used D-76 replenished, no longer do that, one shot only now. If stored in tightly capped bottles in a cupboard out of direct light it keeps a very long time over what Kodak recommends, never refridgerate. My normal use is 1+1 dilution at 20c.
     
  8. Argentum107

    Argentum107 Member

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    As far as I know Fotoimpex develop all films in Adox ATM49 (aka Calbe A49). Compared to D76 it produces finer grain, gives a higher film speed and is more compensating. But all this comes at the price of lower acutance.
     
  9. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    I would really encourage you to read the bag itself and the technical note from Kodak. Just about everything you asked is answered there and more.

    Storage: 6 months in tightly capped bottle. 2 months half full.
    Storage temp: not specified but room temp will work just fine
    You can reuse and replenish. It's in the note. (little more to it than I can explain here) I don't suggest it starting out. I use one shot.
     
  10. dnjl

    dnjl Member

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    If you are trying to be economical, I find the difference between 1+1 and 1+3 solutions to be very marginal. My bottle of D-76 stock kept well for about six months, I discarded what was left after that date. I used a regular PET soda bottle and did not remove the air.
    With regards to mixing, using warm water really helps. Do not shake or stir heavily, as this will introduce air bubbles into the solution. If there are some undissolved flakes left, let it rest for a bit. They're not really harmful though, I once developed some film in freshly mixed D-76 with undissolved crystals because I was in a hurry, and it didn't affect the outcome (then again, maybe I just got lucky).

    For pushing, I would recommend using stock solution for best results.
     
  11. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    Oh, stop being a woosie and just mix the danged developer. Heat 3l of water to 140f and pour the powder in and stir until all disolved. Pour in the remaining cool water to make one gallon. Let it sit until all apparent air is out, then decant into smaller bottles to filled, cap tightly with no air in the bottle. Start using tomorrow, or later this evening at the earliest. Load a roll of TriX in yer camera, set the meter to 400 or whatever you want, and shoot. Now go to Digital truth and look up the time and temp on the Massive development chart(MDC) develope and assess to see if you like it. If you like it, do it again, if not change the speed and try again. Sounds easy doesn't it? Well, it is!
     
  12. buzzardkid

    buzzardkid Member

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    Thanks people for all the replies! (Rick, I like that kind of encouragement :smile:)

    I got home, checked the bag and found that most of the stuff I was asking for was indeed written on the bag itself!

    Never noticed that...:whistling: In my defence, those bags have been in a box for over a year now...

    Mixed the stuff up just now, and will let it sit untill tomorrow afternoon before using it on two rolls of Tri-X400 @800.

    I'm hoping 'classic-looking results from a truly great trip to Berlin' to be the outcome of this! Tomorrow night I might be able to even scan some shots and post them here, to round the thread up nicely!

    Cheers,
    Johan
     
  13. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    If you wish to become familiar with a new film then don't start off by pushing it. You first need to be comfident with the film at its rated speed and normal development. Don't copy what your friend is doing -- he may be pushing the film because he is not exposing it properly.
     
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  15. rince

    rince Subscriber

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    I use Tri-X 400 (120) and D-76 and love the combination. I use D-76 in a 1:1 dilution and use it as a one shot developer. About the shelf life I can not say much, since my D-76 never exceeded ~ 2 month before the gallon was gone. One thing to consider though is, that I feel at least for my camera/lens/development style TriX 400 is more 250 to me, so about 3/4 of a stop slower than box speed. I get very decent negatives using those settings, but you will have to find a setting that works for you and your equipment best. Good luck and have fun.
     
  16. K-G

    K-G Subscriber

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    As this is your first time, keep it as simple as possible. About two years ago one of the Swedish veteran photographers, Gunnar Smoliansky , had an exhibition at Hasselblad Center here in Göteborg , Sweden. At a lecture he held just after the opening, I asked him if he used some special technique for developing. He answered that Everything you need to know is written in the box !
    ( or at least was in those days ).
    Just go for D-76 1+1 mixed according to the datasheet, total darknes when filmloading , use a good thermometer , use fresh fix , wash thoroughly and hang to dry in a DUSTFREE place. When dry, just enjoy the look of wonderful negatives !
    I enclose a link to where you can find the Kodak datasheet for Tri-X.
    Good luck and have fun ! From now on you will be a developoholic.

    Karl-Gustaf

    http://wwwse.kodak.com/global/en/pr...ilmDatabankBW.jhtml?pq-path=13700/14472/14475
     
  17. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

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    When you mix up D-76 wait at least a day if not longer to use it.

    Jeff
     
  18. mopar_guy

    mopar_guy Subscriber

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    I have a good quality water source and use tap water. Tap water can have quite a bit of air dissolved in it so I always boil the water for a few minutes and most of the air will be gone. I let the water cool to the recommended temperature and mix the D-76. I don't use the developer the same day it is mixed.
     
  19. Morituri

    Morituri Member

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    He was quoting Elliott Erwitt by the way who said "Everything you need to know is on the side of the box" or something of that fashion =)
     
  20. buzzardkid

    buzzardkid Member

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    Many nice responses here, thanks a lot all.

    I've been a developoholic (love the term!) for quite some time, but until now I've been using Rodinal (both regular and stand-dev) and this is my first go at D76.
    I'm not too worried about pushing the film one stop, have done so many times with RolleiRetro400S and Tmax400.

    And, I will be scanning the film and finishing in Lightroom/Photoshop, so any low contrasts or even lotsa dust can be corrected. Think I was close enough on the exposures when shooting street scenes and Tri-X is quite forgiving anyway.

    Tonight I will spend my time scanning some of my backlog in film, tomorrow will be the day for the Tri-X and D76 premiere!
     
  21. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    The thing with film is, "the proof is in the printing", not the scanning. TriX screams to be slid into a negative carrier and enlarged the old fashioned way. Once you see it printed you will never want to do any digital manipulation ever again.
     
  22. K-G

    K-G Subscriber

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    As usual , all good phrases have been used before. At least that leaves us with more than one photographer of the same opinion.

    Karl-Gustaf
     
  23. buzzardkid

    buzzardkid Member

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    Rick,

    I'm positive you're right but I'm lacking time, space and skills to print wet, I'm afraid...

    Maybe someday!?
     
  24. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

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    O.K., you have already mixed it up and I hope you waited for it before topping up with cold water. I would suggest that this will keep for well over a year in an air tight bottle. For Tri-X rated at 800 (why), but you have already done this, develop for 14 minutes at 68F/20C at 1:1 dilution.
     
  25. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    If in the future you should ever wish to make a conventional silver print, what are you going to do about the improper exposures and dust spots? Things would be simpler if you do the best job you can processing the film from the beginning. Photoshop should not be the reason for shoddy technique.
     
  26. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    Amen