Edward Weston at Omaha Joslyn Museum

Discussion in 'Book, Magazine, Gallery Reviews, Shows & Contests' started by Jim Chinn, Jul 26, 2006.

  1. Jim Chinn

    Jim Chinn Member

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    I just saw the "Edward Weston: A Photographers Love of Life" exhibit in Omaha and was blown away. The synopsis from the Joslyn web site is below.

    Some additional observations:

    It was very well lighted. You could actually see detail in prints as opposed to the usual dungeon lighting associated with many vintage exhibitions.

    All the prints were printed by Ed with the exception of a print of
    Armco Steel (Pipes and Stacks) which was printed by Cole. That was nice compared to the "Last Years in Carmel" exhibit in which a good portion of the prints were made by Cole or Brett. (also maybe the poorest lighting I had ever seen for photographs at Art Institute of Chicago)

    the 8x10 Kodachrome transparencies were stunning. They were in cases with light boxes. It is easy to see the connection from Ed's color work to the magnificent color work of Cole.

    For myself, the most intersting thing was seeing prints of subjects mentioned in the Daybooks but I had never seen. For example Weston mentions photographing Jueguetes (small toys) and the show has two such prints, both appear to be platinum although not specifically listed as such. Aslo in the daybooks he talks of photographing many vegetable forms besides the well known examples. Several of these lesser known are here.

    IIRC the wall information mentioned 103 prints total.

    There is no info on the web site as to where this show may be traveling to next, if at all. If it makes it to a museum near you make sure to attend.


    Edward Weston: A Photographer's Love of Life
    Through August 13
    This exhibition provides visitors a better understanding and a greater appreciation for Edward Weston the man and the photographer. A virtual survey of Weston's career from his teens to his years in Mexico and Carmel to his Guggenheim fellowship in 1936 and to his final photographs from the late 1940s, the exhibition showcases the work that Weston, arguably the most influential photographer of the 20th century, considered his best. Featuring about 70 of his key photographs from the 1930s through World War II, the exhibition includes such iconic images as Shell, Dunes, Oceano, Pepper, Diego Rivera, and Pelican's Wing, among others. Also included are a selection of brilliant, vintage Kodachrome color transparencies on view to the public for the first time.


    Weston's focus on the beauty in the world around him inspired future generations of photographers. His powerful work made people look at the world differently and helped them see the beauty in such simple things as a shell or a pepper. Personal letters and postcards from his family included in the show offer an intimate view of both this legendary man and his career. The exhibition includes rarely seen snapshots of Weston and his family, dating from the first two decades of the 20th century. According to exhibition curator Alexander Nyerges, these personal items "dispel the notions of Weston as a loner and more accurately portray him as an energetic lover of life."


    Edward Weston: A Photographer's Love of Life was organized by The Dayton Art Institute Director and CEO Alexander Lee Nyerges. The exhibition in Omaha is sponsored in part by Omaha Steaks InternationalĀ® and the Omaha World-Herald.
     
  2. matt miller

    matt miller Subscriber

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    Wow, thanks for the heads up Jim. I'm definitely going to make it over there to see it. Now I'm excited.
     
  3. Jim Jones

    Jim Jones Subscriber

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  4. Earl Dunbar

    Earl Dunbar Member

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    I saw this exhibit at Eastman House and the more I think about it, the more I was underwhelmed. Perhaps the lighting was just bad, but I don't think that would fully explain why I wasn't overly impressed. I don't think the prints themselves, on the whole, were the best Weston could have or did produce. They certainly didn't compare, in terms of pure technique, to Adams prints I've seen.

    The Kodachromes were very interesting mostly because they are, after all, 8x10. But it is clear that Weston was out of his element with colour. Perhaps later on he began to "see"and compose more effortlessly in colour, but those particular chromes looked more like he was simply playing around with a new film. And as good as Kodachrome is for dark storage, those chromes seemed a bit muted, as if they had faded a bit.

    Mind you, I saw this exhibit in Sept. 05, I believe, so it's been awhile. If I could see it again I would, since even if technical quality or display conditions aren't top notch, viewing Weston's work is always a good thing.
     
  5. Allen Friday

    Allen Friday Member

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    Jim,

    Thanks for the heads up on the exhibit. I will be sure to head to the Big O next week.

    Allen
     
  6. mikebarger

    mikebarger Subscriber

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    I saw the exhibit this weekend, and it was outstanding.

    My first time in Omaha, seems like a great city.

    Mike