Edward Weston's Technique

Edward Weston's Technique

  1. Mustafa Umut Sarac

    Mustafa Umut Sarac Member

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    Mustafa Umut Sarac submitted a new resource:

    Edward Weston's Technique - Edward Weston's Technique

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    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 6, 2016 at 5:28 PM
  2. David Allen

    David Allen Member

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    If my memory serves me correctly, Edward Weston's move to glossy paper was the direct result of Brett Weston having done so before him.

    Best,

    David
    www.dsallen.de
     
  3. Eric Rose

    Eric Rose Subscriber

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    Just goes to show talent trumps technique.
     
  4. Vaughn

    Vaughn Member

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    And in the California redwoods he lamented about his failed images under the redwoods -- due, he said, to his tripod (and 8x10) sinking into the duff during his long exposures. Something I can attest to! I always take pains to firmly plant my tripod...spikes help as does putting my 200+ pound weight on each leg to really sink them!

    Vaughn
     
  5. CMB

    CMB Subscriber

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    Weston's early choice of mount was "shirt-stiffner" cardboard that he purchased (cheaply and in bulk) in 1923/4 from a Mexican laundry. He would sign the mount (never the photograph) on the front along with the year the negative was made (and sometimes the title and print edition number). On the back, he would indicate the negative number (eg: "6 PO" for "Galvan Shooting") along with the price ($10). By 1932, he had run out of the shirt cardboard (which have by now all turned brown) and switched to another cardboard support which seems to have fared better (still white today). I don't know what kind of dry-mount tissue he used to adhere the print onto the mount, but none of my four Weston photographs, made between 1925 and 1933, show any signs of delamination.

    Charles
     
  6. tony lockerbie

    tony lockerbie Subscriber

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    Great reading Umut, thanks for that. As Eric says, the subject rules with Weston, and his equipment and working methods are a lesson to us all that gear does not matter a bit if the subject and technique are sound.
    Still, great to muck around with all that gear :smile:
     
  7. vpwphoto

    vpwphoto Subscriber

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    I drove 250 miles to view a special E. Weston exhibition a decade ago. BTW I have a copy of the Verito mentioned above that I have not used enough.
    THanks Mustafa for the post.
     
  8. kevinjk

    kevinjk Member

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    Which 4 prints do you have?
     
  9. CMB

    CMB Subscriber

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    My mention of having four Weston prints was not meant to be boastful but rather to further illustrate, from personal experience, how this great artist,
    using modest and simple materials, crafted some of the finest photographs ever made. And since most only get to see a Weston framed on the wall of
    a museum, I thought that a description of his notes on the back of the mount would be of interest.

    The prints are:

    1. Steel, Ohio, 1922 (Armco Steel)

    2. Galvan Shooting, Mexico, 1924

    3. Succulent, 1930

    4. Monterey Cypress, Pebble Beach, 1932


    Charles
     
  10. jp498

    jp498 Member

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    I've seen some of Edward Weston's 3.25x4.25 pt/pd contact prints (of pictorialist style) in a museum and they are charming alternatives to big "straight" prints.

    I think he could have 1-up'd himself even more if he limited himself to 1-2 soft focus lenses rather than a whole bunch as it's mind boggling difficult to deal with a bunch of them at once and get good results. The interest in great depth of field is much the opposite of most of us; we can have infinite depth of field with i-phones and small sensor cameras and are bored of it.

    It's cool we have the same lenses available to us today, same cameras, same chemicals, similar papers (handmade pt/pd or michael/paula azo) and can have just as much fun and results as Edward Weston did.
     
  11. whlogan

    whlogan Member

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    I had the great pleasure of working with Cole Weston for a few short but very fruitful years in and around Monterey during the 1970's and he taught me that one needs mainly to THINK about what one is doing and it matters not so much what equipment is sitting on the tripod as what thoughts are going on in the brain. I loved him. He was not so easy to work with or for, but I learned a great deal from him and Al Weber. Thank God for giants like these to teach midgets like us.
    Logan