EFKE arschrome 100???

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by 6x6x9, Sep 21, 2006.

  1. 6x6x9

    6x6x9 Member

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    Dear APUG members,
    Since I'm new in photography, recently I've faced one serious problem; two weeks ago, at the local flea market, I've bought 20 diapositive films for 1$. It expired in 1989. It's written "efke arschrome 100" on it, without any process informations nor suggestions. Immediately, I loaded my camera with that particular film, and after finishing it, brought it to the photo store to develop it. Next day they told me that they are not able to develop it because it needs different process, not standard E6. A guy who has been working for them in 1980's told me that arschrome was lounched on the market just before "Univerzijada '87" (student olimpic games in Zagreb 1987) and it was some kind of efke's market strategy. He couldn't recall which process was used to develop that film.

    So, is there any known process for "efke arschrome 100"?
    Beside that, I have one roll of Kodak Ectachrome (120 format). Could I face the same problem with Kodak?
    Thank you for your time and advices.
    PS: sorry for the confusion, I know I'm not accurate when I'm write in english:smile:
     
  2. juan

    juan Subscriber

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    zdravo 6x6x9
    I can't answer the Efke question, but the Ektachrome should be standard E-6. You might check with your lab before you expose it.

    Your English is fine. Much better than my Hrvatski.
    juan
     
  3. htmlguru4242

    htmlguru4242 Member

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    If the Ektachrome's newer than the mid to late 1970s, it's almost certainly E-6. It could be E-4; it'll say on the package somewhere.
     
  4. Earl Dunbar

    Earl Dunbar Member

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    There also were other proprietary reversal chemistries/processes at the time. Agfachrome CT-18 was such a proprietary process. It's possible there were other films, such as Efke, that were based on that process. If so, there's no hope of getting it processed properly, though it could be cross-processed in C-41 chemistry. The results would be weird at best, and useless at worst.

    BTW, I liked CT18 better than anything except Kodachrome.
     
  5. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Earlier products will not go through modern processes due to the temperature.

    Don't process old color films in modern processes (general rule) as they are too soft.

    PE
     
  6. Kevin Caulfield

    Kevin Caulfield Subscriber

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    I can certainly understand why the name was not successful! :wink:
     
  7. DBP

    DBP Member

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    Looking back, I am sure sales bottomed out rather quickly.
     
  8. Kevin Caulfield

    Kevin Caulfield Subscriber

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    That would have been a bummer for all concerned.
     
  9. htmlguru4242

    htmlguru4242 Member

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    True, but you could always hand-process it at a lower temperature
     
  10. ZorkiKat

    ZorkiKat Member

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    That film might require one of the old Agfachrom/Agfacolor based colour diapositive processes that became prevalent in Eastern Europe. One such process is ORWO 9165.

    The processing temperatures used by "modern" E6 is much higher than what is used by ORWO 9165: E6 is at 38 C and ORWO used an average of 25 C. Not only that- the Agfa and Kodak colour processing systems used different chemicals with equally different reactions to create the colour dyes. Lowering temperatures is not enough. I would also speculate that the couplers in the emulsion of an Agfacolor based film may not react to a chromogenic Kodak colour developer to form colour dyes.

    Jay
     
  11. jd callow

    jd callow Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    It might also be that this film is B/w neg and the name is misleading. Somehow, someone needs to find out what this film is and the process it was built to use.

    Where is Edz? He seemed to be an authority on all things agfa.

    Regardless a snip test and d76 would probably tell a lot.
     
  12. srs5694

    srs5694 Member

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    Since it sounds like you'll have a hard time getting this film processed as its creators intended, let me throw in a suggestion for something wild to try: NCF-41. This is a divided developer for C-41 negative films that works at 75F, so unlike most modern color developers, it won't ruin the emulsion by temperature alone. At best, you'll be able to use the film for cross-processing purposes, getting negatives with weird colors from the film. At worst, it'll ruin the film and you'll be out $1 for the roll plus whatever you spend on the chemistry. (You could use the rest of the NCF-41 to process C-41 film, but I wouldn't recommend using it for critical rolls, since my personal experience is that it produces variable results.)

    NCF-41 is a mix-it-yourself formula, so you'll need to buy a stock of raw chemicals, if you don't have them already. The formula was posted in the "articles" section of the old APUG, but I gather that section hasn't been transferred yet. Send me a PM if you want the formula.
     
  13. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    The C41 developer probably won't work at 68 degrees due to chemical activity problems. I have tried it and it loses a lot of activity.

    PE
     
  14. 6x6x9

    6x6x9 Member

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    Thanks to everyone for your time and such detailed and useful informations.
    Snjesko.
     
  15. nworth

    nworth Subscriber

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    Unfortunately, it isn't just the temperature. The older films needed benzyl alcohol in the color developer to release the couplers. The newer films used a different coupler system.
     
  16. Rolleijoe

    Rolleijoe Member

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    Since you're in Zagreb, why not take it to Fotokemika and ask? There may be someone around who could give you a more definitive answer.
     
  17. janimir

    janimir Member

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    I'm not sure that we can find someone in Fotokemika who might know something about old processes, but I'm sure we can find someone (retired from Fotokemika) at saturdays photo-flea-market :smile:
    (btw, Fotokemika is now located in Samobor, near Zagreb)