Efke R100 + Microphen

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by timing, Oct 22, 2008.

  1. timing

    timing Member

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    I need some advice please as I'm about to process my first film.

    I have a couple of rolls of the above film and was also supplied Microphen developer. Consulting the Massive Dev Chart it seems that the dev time of 18 minutes with a dilution of 1+3 at 21 degrees C. is a starting point.

    OK, I can understand that but is there anything else I should be aware of? I'm assuming one inversion every minute?

    I'll be using a Paterson universal development tank.

    Sorry if this seems like a dumb question but I'm keen not to make a daft avoidable mistake by getting the advice before starting.

    Thanks,

    Tim
     
  2. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    EFKE films are quirky but the ISO speeds are old school, so do some tests. I use KB25/R25 & PL 25 at 50 ISO with superb esults, well I know them better by the KB14 Din name :D

    Ian
     
  3. timing

    timing Member

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    Thanks Ian.

    Well, I give it a shot at the weekend and I have to say that I was rather pleased - at least, pleased that something came out!

    Unfortunately I've been without internet access for a couple of weeks and somehow, in my head, I remembered a development time of 20 mins. Not sure how much difference that makes but exposures do seem to have more contrast than I remember from the scene at the time.

    I processed in the tank described above with agitiation for 10secs (three inversions) every minute. Stopped with plain old water and fixed with FF-1 for 10 mins before a final wash with water and nothing else. Wiped the negatives with my fingers and dried with the aid of a couple of old clothes pegs.

    As I don't have an enlarger etc yet so I (ahem) scanned the photos and viewed them last night. A couple of frames looked a little odd until I remembered exposing the few shots as ISO400 rather than ISO100. The rest looked absolutely fine although contrasty.

    I'm happy to post the results but wary of invoking the wrath of the analogue-ists given the digital step.

    Also when loading the spool, I loaded without removing the paper backing first - it was taken off as I loaded. Not at all difficult and resulted in less neg damage than I was expecting (scratches etc). Oh, one other slight boob - I forgot the spindle that the reel goes onto - the black reel that helps prevent accidental exposure of the film when you add the liquids - result, the first few frames are ruined.

    Other than that, a very rewarding experience.

    Tim