EI for Kodak Portra 400NC

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by sperera, Apr 1, 2010.

  1. sperera

    sperera Member

    Messages:
    209
    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2009
    Location:
    Gibraltar, E
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    .......so i have a shoot in 1 hour and I'm thinking of using some Portra 400NC as well as my beloved 160NC....I think i need to rate it at 320 asa as opposed to 400 asa....what are your thoughts people....its a person shoot so bring on some fine skin tones..........
     
  2. Sysygy

    Sysygy Member

    Messages:
    26
    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2006
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I always rate it at box speed.
     
  3. Tim Gray

    Tim Gray Member

    Messages:
    1,786
    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2006
    Location:
    OH
    Shooter:
    35mm
    400? I've never had any problems with it there. 320 will be fine too - also gives you a bit of extra wiggle room to account for a bit of variability in metering, etc.
     
  4. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

    Messages:
    25,905
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I've used both box speed and 320 and they both look fine.

    PE
     
  5. sperera

    sperera Member

    Messages:
    209
    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2009
    Location:
    Gibraltar, E
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    great stuff thanks....I shot at 320 as per recommendation from the master and guru himself Photo Engineer!
     
  6. hrst

    hrst Member

    Messages:
    1,299
    Joined:
    May 10, 2007
    Location:
    Finland
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    EI 250 or EI 200 would also have looked wonderful, and probably even EI 500 :wink:.

    There is quite a lot of exposure latitude, especially if you overexpose. The level of shadow detail you want determine the EI for you. If you want more shadow detail than "normal", overexpose. You can shoot it even at 100 if you want to exaggerate this effect! The risk of "blowing highlights" is in my opinion almost nonexistent with modern color neg films.

    And, if you are fine with less than "normal" shadow detail, you can underexpose it. EI 800? Possible. Gives nice contrast to regions that normally are at highlights.

    What is "normal", only you can decide for yourself by testing the film in several shooting situations, but the nominal ISO value suits most of the people. It's all about your personal taste and shooting situations.
     
  7. sperera

    sperera Member

    Messages:
    209
    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2009
    Location:
    Gibraltar, E
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    thanks for the information everyone so far!
     
  8. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

    Messages:
    25,905
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Let us know what you think of the results. And thanks but I am just an ordinary guy!

    PE
     
  9. Bruce Watson

    Bruce Watson Member

    Messages:
    443
    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2005
    Location:
    Central NC
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    Riiiiiight. You're just an ordinary guy when it comes to photography. Now *that* is an April Fools' joke!
     
  10. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

    Messages:
    8,003
    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2008
    Location:
    Los Angeles,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I use it anywhere from 250 to 2000, depending on what sort of look I want, and/or what I can get away with exposure wise.

    When I want it to look how Kodak intended it to look, I rate it at box speed and use an incident meter.

    When I know I want to overexpose every single shot, for whatever reason (usually for a tad more bite and detail in the shadows), I rate it at 250. I don't rate it below that even if I want more overexposure. I prefer to do the additional overexposure manually after doing the first 2/3 stop built in by rerating.

    When placing low tones, I usually use EI 500, and push 1/2 stop, due to the film's relatively low contrast.

    It has a lot of underexposure latitude (relatively), and is low in contrast (relatively), so it is good for underexposing and pushing. It is the only fast color 4x5 film in existence, so I use it hand held, often rated at 500, 1000, or 2000, depending on the light. You can pull off 250 with hand held 4x5 in good light, but once you shoot in darker light, you need to underexpose, and the film performs well when you need to do this, up to about 2-1/2 stops (EI 2000 or so), if you push to compensate.
     
  11. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

    Messages:
    25,905
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Then you should meet some of the other Kodak engineers.

    Thanks though.

    PE
     
  12. Kiron Kid

    Kiron Kid Member

    Messages:
    441
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2005
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I rate it @ 320, and get wonderful results.

    Kiron Kid
     
  13. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

    Messages:
    25,905
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Show some pix!

    PE
     
  14. sperera

    sperera Member

    Messages:
    209
    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2009
    Location:
    Gibraltar, E
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Photo Engineer on APUG is like having Lance Armstrong ride with us on a Sunday morning giving us tips all the time....
     
  15. sperera

    sperera Member

    Messages:
    209
    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2009
    Location:
    Gibraltar, E
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    YES, PLEASE POST SOME PORTRA 400NC PIC PEOPLE.....the labs closed so i dont know what i have from yesterday.....regardless it wasnt a fashion shoot but the son of a friend of ours who's doing their Communion this year and she wanted some shots for the grandmother etc with the kid in white and all that.....so I used it mainly to test it for future fashion shoots i have lined up