Electricity and Film- now this is awesome

Discussion in 'Photographers' started by david b, Sep 9, 2009.

  1. david b

    david b Member

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  2. tjaded

    tjaded Subscriber

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    Hmmm...I'm going to go take a look at that gallery! Thanks for posting.
     
  3. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    Interesting. Thanks.

    Steve
     
  4. Mike1234

    Mike1234 Inactive

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    If you like that then search for what high voltage does to titanium. :smile:
     
  5. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    Mike, any good references for that?
     
  6. Mike1234

    Mike1234 Inactive

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    ^^^ I'm looking but so far I've only located commercial sites... nothing instructional.

    EDIT: Here are a couple of sites showing rainbow anodization. all I can find are commercially available products... sorry. The thing I saw years ago involved high voltage electrodes dragged across the surface of titanium sheet metal resulting in some pretty wild colorful shapes with lightening-like spark patterns. But I can't find anything on that process now.

    http://davesknifeworld.com/?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=11327

    http://www.spacepen.com/rainbowtitaniumnitridebulletpen.aspx
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 9, 2009
  7. polyglot

    polyglot Member

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    And in a similar vein, Energie!. Big epilepsy warning on that one though.
     
  8. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser

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  9. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    So, this guy had a dry lab and got a lot of static electricity, right?

    Wow, a hero. :D

    It is common for static discharge to reach 500,000 - 1,000,000 V with low amperage and the results enlarged will look like what you see. I hate to inject a note of reality here, but there is nothing new. You can generate these easily in your dry darkroom.

    PE
     
  10. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

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    Very interesting! Looks great to me.

    Jeff
     
  11. aca91

    aca91 Member

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    I was looking for a post like this (I know it's old). I have many question regarding those pictures: can this process be made with any kind of emulsion? I want to do something similar on a home made emulsion on canvas. Also. how can I generate a static discharge like that one? Can you guess a way of obtaining such results?

    Thank you very much, I hope someone answers.
     
  12. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    All emulsions are sensitive to the radiation emitted by lightning discharges such as static electricity. The density of the image formed is proportional to the speed of the emulsion.

    All you need is a dry lab and you begin to get such discharges. You can even generate them with scotch tape. Put some tape onto a piece of plastic, sit in the dark to adapt your eyes and then peel the tape off of the plastic. You will see bright flashes.

    PE
     
  13. benjiboy

    benjiboy Subscriber

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    The next experiment should be applying 400,000 V to the rear ends of Kodak management team :D
     
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  15. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member

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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Van_de_Graaff_generator
     
  16. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    With a Tesla Coil you can get millions of volts!

    I agree that Kodak might get moving with that applied to management.

    PE
     
  17. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member

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    So you can with a Van de Graaff. But a Tesla coil does not produce static electricity; not that that matters for these purposes.
     
  18. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    It is the intense blast of UV along with the jagged path of static electricity across the film that makes pretty patterns.

    It is the million volts of lightning that gets management moving.

    Sorry I was unclear.

    PE
     
  19. batwister

    batwister Member

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    I'm trying to work out what's more impressive, the beautiful images or the scientific explanations... :confused: Ohhh, photography.
     
  20. Diapositivo

    Diapositivo Member

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    This is not "photography" because it does not involve light but "electrography" because it is electricity which forms the image on the electricity-sensitive film.

    I therefore think this discussion should be moved to the sister site EPUG (ElectroPhotography User Group) because it doesn't belong here :wink:

    By the way, ask a digital photographer if he can do that with his camera! :wink::whistling:
     
  21. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    This is "photography", pure and simple.

    The static discharge emits light just like lightning and just like lightning it can be imaged on film. Nothing magic.

    PE
     
  22. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    I beg to differ PE!

    IMHO, ALL photography is at least a little bit magic :smile:
     
  23. aca91

    aca91 Member

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    I think I'm loosing something big here. What is a dry lab?
     
  24. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    One that uses inkjet printers only.
     
  25. Newt_on_Swings

    Newt_on_Swings Member

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    I actually hate when this happens when I double load 120 film, which I have to remove atleast one piece of tape to adhere to next roll to fit on one spool. If I see sparks I go super slow and usually breathe a bit of moist air onto the area.
     
  26. Diapositivo

    Diapositivo Member

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    Ah, yes, that's a common phenomenon, with cameras with manual rewind knob it is advised to rewind the film slowly to avoid static electricity discharges, which will be visible in the images. Nihil novi sub sole.